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Should I apply to SCIT?

  1. Jan 7, 2014 #1
    Should I apply to Southern California Institute of Technology (SCIT)? If you attended that school, can you tell me how difficult it is to get into that school? I know that students have to take the entrance exam to get into that school for admission in verbal and math, but what level of math is it? I'm in Calculus, will I pass the entrance exam? Do they require letters of recommendations from my teachers? Can students apply for application fee waivers? Also, how can you fill out the application? Through commonapp or is there a specific website?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 7, 2014 #2
    Unless you are talking about California Institute of Technology then dont do it.

    SCIT is a for profit school ala ITT Tech and Wyotech which gives you a degree with less marketability than a community college AA.
     
  4. Jan 8, 2014 #3
    I'm not talking about Cal-Tech because that college is way too competitive for me. So if I were to go SCIT, I can't find a job after I graduate from there, is that what you were saying?
     
  5. Jan 8, 2014 #4
    You can probably find a job now without any degree. You want a specific kind of job though right? If what jesse73 says is true (that its like ITT) then I wouldnt bother either. Just go to your local community college.
     
  6. Jan 8, 2014 #5

    Student100

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    What degree/trade program were you planning on enrolling in?

    The fees aren't exorbitant. As long as you realize this is a trade school, and that’s what you want to do— go for it.

    Just some random info from their EET degree: https://www.scitech.edu/programs/electrical-engineering-bachelors-degree, seems like a fair tuition cost to me, and it would help you land a technician job easier.
     
  7. Jan 8, 2014 #6
    Its not going to be worth it. There are similar programs at CCs which aren't looking to profit so much from you.
     
  8. Jan 8, 2014 #7

    Student100

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    Last time I checked you couldn't get a B.S. EET degree from CC's. Maybe I'm wrong.
     
  9. Jan 8, 2014 #8
    What community colleges would you suggest me to apply? I've only applied to Pasadena City College. I live in California.
     
  10. Jan 8, 2014 #9
    My goal is to get Bachelor's degree in electrical engineering as soon as possible.
     
  11. Jan 8, 2014 #10

    Student100

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    What do you want to do in electrical engineering?

    The college you listed is not advisable than, since it grants EET degrees.

    CCC system is great because they are set up to help you transfer to either the UC or CSU systems. You want to check the accreditation, transfer programs, and speak to someone at any of the CC's you plan on applying to.

    I would recommend transferring to one of the UC system schools for engineering. At CC you will be doing all your math/physics/science prereq's and some GE like English. It's unlikely you will do any engineering at all. Once you transfer you'll be admitted into pre-major or major status and actually start your engineering education.

    Don’t expect it to be fast though, if you require any remedial courses in math or English you should expect to be at CC for around three years before transferring.

    Assist.org will help you see your pre-major requirements and what courses are articulated between your CC and the UC of your choice.

    Edit: Say you were going to PCC and you wanted to transfer to UCSD for electrical engineering, here is the assist.org recommended major prep:

    http://web1.assist.org/web-assist/r...NA&oia=UCSD&aay=13-14&ay=13-14&dora=ELEC+ENGR

    It's nice right now because EE is open, this fluctuates somewhat. So as you see, the undergrad engineering courses aren't available to you at CC (they normally aren't) so you'll spend your time doing math/physics, two courses in English, a foreign language, chem, a computer language, and either the IGETC or GE major prep by college in UCSD you plan to apply to.

    Typically you'll need 60 units to be considered an upper division transfer student.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2014
  12. Jan 9, 2014 #11
    Obviously one would need to transfer since CCs max out at Associate degrees which I assumed everyone knew but I suppose not.

    From CCs there is a much more systematic transfer process to UCs and CSUs any which is better than the for profit school and much much cheaper in cost.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2014
  13. Jan 9, 2014 #12

    Student100

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    Cost of attendance for one year at UCSD is $30k if you live on campus, so you're going to pay around 60k for two years. Then factor in three years CC, which is cheap, but cost of living in California is high. It isn't cheaper than the program he listed.

    The point was, which may have been lost to you, if he wanted to go to a trade school, and get a B.S. EET degree it’s was a viable option. Cost for the program wasn't any more excessive than it is for public universities.

    He wants to get an EE degree, so he'll need to go the CC -> Uni route.
     
  14. Jan 9, 2014 #13
    Why should the cost of living matter for CCs but not this trade school. Is there room and board provided for free at SCIT or it is out of state or is that an unfair comparison between CCs and the trade school?

    All of the comparisons ignore the fact that for profit schools aren't viewed favorably in the job market there is an cost associated with this disadvantage.

    I am pleased you are now advocating for the CC -CSU route which I tried to steer him into since the start so I suppose we are in agreement.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2014
  15. Jan 9, 2014 #14

    Student100

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    I'm assuming he would live at home while going to the trade school and also community college. I'm not saying it's cheaper per say, but it is comparable.

    Employers don't look favorably at learning a trade? I find that hard to believe. For profit diploma mills, sure, but trades are also an important component in the work force. A degree like EET serves a purpose, a purpose different than an EE degree that would qualify you for design jobs. Technicians aren't hurting in the job market, and in some cases the work is more in line with what the person actually wants to do. Not everyone wants to be a design engineer; some people actually want to be field engineers or test and integration engineers.

    I advise against going to CSU for engineering, he should try to transfer to the UC system.
     
  16. Jan 9, 2014 #15
    There are CSUs and UCs across the state which means there is no reason if he wanted to he couldn't live at home and commute if costs where of utmost importance. Everyone agrees he should try to get into the best school possible but a CSU would still leave him better off than a for profit.
     
  17. Jan 9, 2014 #16

    Student100

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    You're still comparing two different kinds of schools, traditional versus trade.

    They don't focus on the same thing.
     
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