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Should I change courses?

  • #1

Main Question or Discussion Point

Hello All,

Im from the UK and am currently at University studying Graphic Design, while I enjoy that course I feel I would enjoy physics more.
I'm a mature student and only have GCSEs, C grades in Maths, English Lang, and Double C in Science. A few Ds in other subjects.
I was considering changing and doing a Physics degree with a foundation year, while this would help me, I was just wondering how quickly this would get me up to speed with physics.
I dont want to complete the foundation year and still be a bit confused as to whats going on (if you get what I mean)

Anyway, If anyone has been in a similar situation and wouldn't mind sharing with me, it would be greatly appreciated as well as any help or advice from others here on the forum.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
AlephZero
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
6,994
291
I wouldn't want to discourage anybody, but the normal entry level for a UK physics degree would be good A level grades in maths and physics, and many people taking those A levels at school would have straight A grades in maths and science at GCSE level.

I don't know what would the entry requirements to your foundation year course would be, but given your GCSE grades (presumably taken some time ago if you are a mature student) maybe you would be better first taking the A levels, and any other "revision" courses that you need, at a more gentle pace (i.e. 2 years not one) at further education college. You may be able to do the FE courses as evening classes, if you need to earn some money as well.
 
  • #3
42
0
Hey man, whatever you think is right, just believe in your self. Don't get discouraged and think just because its hard, you can't do it. At the same time however, if your going to try, I'd suggest studying really hard, and I mean low life hard.

Cheers m8:D
 
  • #4
1
0
Hello All,

Im from the UK and am currently at University studying Graphic Design, while I enjoy that course I feel I would enjoy physics more.
I'm a mature student and only have GCSEs, C grades in Maths, English Lang, and Double C in Science. A few Ds in other subjects.
I was considering changing and doing a Physics degree with a foundation year, while this would help me, I was just wondering how quickly this would get me up to speed with physics.
I dont want to complete the foundation year and still be a bit confused as to whats going on (if you get what I mean)

Anyway, If anyone has been in a similar situation and wouldn't mind sharing with me, it would be greatly appreciated as well as any help or advice from others here on the forum.
It all depends on what do you want to do about Physics...
Phyisics is a very interesting and rewarding subject... and a the same time a very demanding one not only on our time but on our intellectual capacity.
If what you want goes with the interesting parts of physics but does not go into the high energy physics, or quantum physics or the advances areas. you should want to pursue it.
If not then ... you may carefuly consider....
 
  • #5
As you have got poor grade so it might be tough for you to take degree in physics..but if you work hard and you like physics then you can easily get through..so do what you want
 
  • #6
86
0
i failed a course in my first semester due to loads of problems beyond my control but i always like blaming myself exemple(poor senior school level compared to my university entry and poor lectures which i don't like talking about). trust me, i heard sleepless nights and was really discouraged. i was amongst the best students in the other semesters after realising my mistakes and pieces of adive from elders and this noble forum as well. i will advice you to increase your coffee bill, from school to your home, reduce socialising, be yourself, always look up, try to make your teachers your mentors, sit-up, tight-up and finally read! read!!! read!!! to the max. you can make it bro, if i can. i should just tell you how i struggled to be there. Nothing is difficult until you convince yourself it is so. Consider the demanding subjects/courses as challenges. if you are someone that like girls is better your stop or reduce because it will waste your time. it nearly killed me. so let this be useful to you.

regards
 
  • #7
cristo
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
8,107
73
Hello All,

Im from the UK and am currently at University studying Graphic Design, while I enjoy that course I feel I would enjoy physics more.
I'm a mature student and only have GCSEs, C grades in Maths, English Lang, and Double C in Science. A few Ds in other subjects.
I was considering changing and doing a Physics degree with a foundation year, while this would help me, I was just wondering how quickly this would get me up to speed with physics.
I dont want to complete the foundation year and still be a bit confused as to whats going on (if you get what I mean)

Anyway, If anyone has been in a similar situation and wouldn't mind sharing with me, it would be greatly appreciated as well as any help or advice from others here on the forum.
How do you know that you would enjoy physics more when you haven't studied any physics?

With that aside, you will probably get accepted into a science foundation programme, but you should note that these are really meant for either international students who do not have the correct qualifications, or for people with A levels slightly below the required. You will need to brush your knowledge of GCSE maths/physics up to at least a grade A standard, and then learn AS and A level maths in physics all within a year.

I think the better plan for you is to try and study A level maths/physics at a college before attempting to get into university.
 
  • #8
1,199
25
As you are enjoying doing graphics design why not carry on with that? To find out if you would *really* like physics then why not take an Open University course? You can start out with something like:

http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/course/s154.htm

...which shouldn't be too hard to study on top of your graphics design degree. Then you can add in other courses when you want - avoiding doing any in your final graphics design year for instance!

If you *really* like physics then you can go full steam ahead and get that BSc physics a couple of years after doing your graphics design degree (that degree might even count for some course points!) So then in, say, five years you can have degrees in graphic design *and* physics - any job involving these two subjects should now be right down your street - for instance, the OU has a graphics design department designing specialist materials for physics courses. Physics book publishers need graphic designers. Computer games use a lot of physics and graphics design, finance houses need graphics designers who can draw and understand complex physics-like graphs, the CERN website needs nice graphics... and on...
 
  • #9
Thanks everyone for the replies, I've decided to talk get in contact with the universities offering physics with foundation year to find out what the minimal amount of physics knowledge id need to brush up on. Not that i'd only brush up to the minimum, just to know how much i'd have to try and learn.

There are a few universities that would take me with the gcses that I have C in science and maths. So I don't think it would be a problem.

I will continue the Graphic Design course, but if I was given the chance to do physics I would take it.

Thanks again everyone for the replies, I'll post back here and let you know how I get on. Could help others in a similar situation.
 
  • #10
cristo
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
8,107
73
There are a few universities that would take me with the gcses that I have C in science and maths. So I don't think it would be a problem.
Really? I don't know of any decent university that will accept you onto a foundation programme without at least one pass at A level, let alone with C's at GCSE.
 
  • #11
I worded that wrong, I meant that there minimum GCSE is C grades in maths and science, and with low grade A-Levels. The foundation year is for students who haven't studied physics or any sciences at A level and, like a poster previously wrote, international students.
 
  • #12
cristo
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
8,107
73
I worded that wrong, I meant that there minimum GCSE is C grades in maths and science, and with low grade A-Levels.
I also doubt this. The science foundation programmes that I know of require somewhat relevant A levels, albeit at a lower level than for acceptance onto degree programmes, and at least some sign of competence in GCSE science/maths. The question is, is a grade C a sign of competence?

Anyway, I'd be interested in how you get on, but if I were you I'd be wary of being used as a cash-cow for the university.
 
  • #13
42
0
i failed a course in my first semester due to loads of problems beyond my control but i always like blaming myself exemple(poor senior school level compared to my university entry and poor lectures which i don't like talking about). trust me, i heard sleepless nights and was really discouraged. i was amongst the best students in the other semesters after realising my mistakes and pieces of adive from elders and this noble forum as well. i will advice you to increase your coffee bill, from school to your home, reduce socialising, be yourself, always look up, try to make your teachers your mentors, sit-up, tight-up and finally read! read!!! read!!! to the max. you can make it bro, if i can. i should just tell you how i struggled to be there. Nothing is difficult until you convince yourself it is so. Consider the demanding subjects/courses as challenges. if you are someone that like girls is better your stop or reduce because it will waste your time. it nearly killed me. so let this be useful to you.

regards
Hey bro, I know I dont know you, but thats awesome and, your right. I may not be old but I know hard work and determination gets you places. Once again, good job to you, and I hope cristo makes it to, like you. In a couple of years, I'll face the same problems.

All the best wishes.
 
  • #14
86
0
In a couple of years, I'll face the same problems.
All the best wishes.
thanks a lot, the pleasure is mine. what level are you now?
 
  • #15
42
0
I'm sorry I think its kind of personal to me however, your very welcome and the please was also mine.

All the best wishes:biggrin: P.S (please dont take it personally, I'm just very secure:))
 

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