Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Silicon oxide on the moon

  1. Feb 3, 2015 #1
    It is said that the tides on earth are due to the moon's gravity. But the moon consists half of silicon oxide, the stuff that also comes with the new camera/shoes in that little bag, and acts like a moist absorber. So maybe there are two reasons for the tides?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 3, 2015 #2

    Bandersnatch

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Consider:

    1) there's a high tide on the opposite side of Earth too. Away from the Moon.
    2) the tides affect everything the Earth is made of, not just water.
    3) gravity accounts for all the observations; there's no room for an additional effect
    4) moisture absorbers don't work like that
     
  4. Feb 3, 2015 #3

    phinds

    User Avatar
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    That is hilarious. I normally report these utter-nonsense posts but I got such a chuckle out of this that I'm going to hope they leave it up. :smile:
     
  5. Feb 3, 2015 #4
    I meant is it certain that SiO2 only absorbs water through direct contact, and there's no attraction at all when there is space (literally) in between them?

    And if it's gravity of the moon that attracts the water, why do we only see water attraction and nothing else that goes up, or wants to go up, to the moon?
     
  6. Feb 3, 2015 #5

    phinds

    User Avatar
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    Oh ... you were SERIOUS

    Yes, it is certain that with a couple of hundred thousand miles between them, the water and the Si02 don't even know of each others existence (other than through gravity)

    Everything DOES want to go to the moon (that is, is attracted by the moon's gravity). It just wants to stay on Earth more. And since it's all held down by gravity or other bonds, it stays down. The water has more freedom of motion and so shows what is by comparison to the distances involved a trivial effect. It just seems noticeable to us because it's significant by human standards. A few feet out of several hundred thousand miles is pretty insignificant.
     
  7. Feb 4, 2015 #6

    davenn

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    you also forgot about the Sun's gravity effect on the earth and its oceans
     
  8. Feb 4, 2015 #7

    Bystander

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    "Nothing else?" Wrong. There are atmospheric and crustal tides. Viscosity of the crust is such that you don't notice it creeping up over your feet twice a day, and technically you are part of the crust so are moving with it rather than remaining independent of lunar gravitation. The atmospheric tides are difficult to sort out from diurnal heating and cooling, but are there.
     
  9. Feb 5, 2015 #8

    Garth

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Lets tie lots of bags of SiO2 together to a capsule and fly to the Moon! ;)

    Garth

    EDIT Oh No! I've got it wrong - it would go the wrong way. :)) Nevermind perhaps NASA could use it to get back from the Moon!!:):rolleyes::D
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2015
  10. Feb 5, 2015 #9

    phinds

    User Avatar
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    Right ... you got it backwards ... we have to tie bags of water together to fly to the moon.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Silicon oxide on the moon
  1. The moon? (Replies: 10)

  2. No moon (Replies: 13)

  3. The moon (Replies: 5)

  4. The Moon! (Replies: 16)

Loading...