1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Simple Harmonic Motion Help Please

  1. Dec 31, 2013 #1
    Q+MS.png
    I need help for the second part please. How do the oscillations being damped prevent them from being S.H.M. as well the other 2 points? I need an explanation so I can understand. The oscillations would still have the same time period eve if they are damped.

    Q+MS 2.png
    Low frequency due to mass/density (of spheres)

    Can someone please explain that to me as I don't understand it.

    Q+MS 3.png
    Isn't T supposed to be constant as it is independent of the amplitude theta, right?

    T=2π√(m/k)
    So surely as m increases T increases like the graph of y=√x?

    How does good suspension in a car help prevent resonance in the various parts of the car?
    Prevention of resonance:
    Damps oscillations (1)
    Fewer forced oscillations (1)
    Explanation of damping [e.g. in terms of energy transfers] (1) Max 2

    For the last part, I understand that the suspension damps oscillations, but I'm not fully sure how there are fewer forced oscillations. Is it because that the damping causes the oscillations to die away quicker, so they stop quicker. Hence there are fewer forced oscillations?

    Q+MS 5.png
    I think the MS answer is wrong as I got k=1.40Nm^-1 using T=2π√(m/k). What did others get?


    THANKS SO MUCH!:biggrin:
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2013
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 1, 2014 #2

    Simon Bridge

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    What do the letters "S.H.M." stand for? Does this describe damped harmonic motion?

    How does the mass density affect the movement?

    Depends.

    That equation makes some assumptions about the system - what if those assumptions do not hold?

    When the suspension is good - what do you want to happen to the oscillations?
    Think about situations where you experience good suspension.

    Nope - that would amount to "doing the work for you", which is not allowed.
    How did you get that answer? What was your reasoning?
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: Simple Harmonic Motion Help Please
Loading...