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Simple Harmonic Motion

  1. Nov 28, 2014 #1
    I did an experiment at school, and the experiment SET UP that i did is basically shown in the word attachment link.

    http://www.schoolphysics.co.uk/age16-19/Mechanics/Statics/experiments/bending_of_a_beam.doc.

    I have two questions!

    Question 1:when i did the experiment, I found that with a greater length (L), the depression (y) was also greater (the weight was constant).

    So the question is,WHY would the depression would increase as the length increases.

    Question 2:We were also told to pull the mass down, and then release it. This resulted in the ruler oscillating up and down - exhibiting simple harmonic motion.
    I found that (when the weight is constant) when you decrease the length (L), the time period of oscillations decreased, and so the frequency increased.

    I again want to know WHY the frequency increased as length decreases.

    NOTE:The attachment was just there to clarify what the experiment setup was like, as i felt i wouldn't be able to explain it well. In reality we only measured the change in depression (y) as the length (L) increased and how the frequency changed with increasing length (L) (when we displaced the masses). We always used a constant mass of 1kg.
    The questions 1 and 2 that i have asked are things I don't understand myself.


    If someone could also provide equations to help explain the results i would be extreeeeemely grateful!!!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 28, 2014 #2

    CWatters

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    Hint: Levers.
     
  4. Nov 28, 2014 #3
    so, are you implying its to do with moments?
     
  5. Nov 28, 2014 #4

    haruspex

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    Yes.
     
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