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Simple harmonic oscillators

  1. Mar 23, 2006 #1
    Can anybody give me the hint where to start on this question?

    Two simple harmonic oscillators of the same frequency and in the same direction having amplitudes 5 mm and 3 mm, respectively and the phase of the second component relative to the first is 30°, are superimposed. Find the amplitude of the resultant oscillation and its phase relative to the first component.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 23, 2006 #2

    Chi Meson

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    Whether or not it will suffice as "properly done," try manually graphing these waves on graph paper (two cycles of each wave, max), and adding their amplitudes to find the superimposed amplitude. It will give you insight to what is going on.

    If you need to show the math, begin by finding the expression for amplitude for each wave as a funtion of wt.
     
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