1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Simple motion graphs i need some clarification

  1. Oct 9, 2003 #1
    Ok. Please look at the attachment for the first part, and this web link for the second part. http://www.prenhall.com/divisions/esm/adv/tiponline/rankingtask/files/01KINEMA/kine003.pdf

    For the first worksheet, this is what I have so far.
    1. A
    2. D
    3. F
    4. E
    5. B
    6. C
    Is it right, or what do I need to change?

    One question that I am unsure about is...does incline affect the velocity? A and F have the same motion, but one is going in the downward direction, and the other is going in the upward direction. But because their motion is the same, can I say that their velocity is the same also??

    The second pdf file:

    I said its going to be:
    1. A
    2. D
    3. F
    4. E
    5. B
    6. C

    I know that B and E have constant velocity, so their acceleration is zero. C is slowing down, so its acceleration will be the lowest.
    Now what I'm debating is that the motion of A, F, (maybe D) are the same, its just that their on different inclines. But does this mean their accelerations are the same also? Yea, I definitely need some clarification here.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Oct 9, 2003
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 10, 2003 #2
    You're on the right track. Just give it some more thought.

    You are thinking that the incline is significant because you know from experience that things usually accelerate downhill. Why is that so?

    Now, in these problems, you are not told what force, if any, is acting on these balls. Is it gravity, electrostatic force, maybe wind ... ? Are they on the surface of the earth, or in deep space?

    All you know are the various successive positions of the balls relative to their previous positions, and you are told that the time intervals are constant. (It is not stated, but I guess you can assume that the scale is the same in all of the drawings.) So you can assume that where the speed changes, there is acceleration, and where there is acceleration, there is SOME force.

    So, what's faster, 60 mph uphill or 60 mph downhill?
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Simple motion graphs i need some clarification
Loading...