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Simple photon question pt 2

  1. Aug 6, 2004 #1

    mee

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    What exactly does the wavelength of a photon denote? Vibration, pulsation? Why does the smaller wavelengths connote higher energies? What is it about high energies that causes smaller wavelengths?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 6, 2004 #2
    A smaller wavelength corresponds to a higher frequency via the deBroglie-relations. This way of looking at a particle as if it were a wave is the basic property of QM. Just think of the amount of energy of a certain foton as represented by a wave with corresponding frequency.
     
  4. Aug 6, 2004 #3

    mathman

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    A simple way of looking at is E=hf, where E is energy, h is Planck's constant, and f is frequency. Frequency is inversely proportional to wavelength.
     
  5. Aug 7, 2004 #4

    mee

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    Thank you for showing what is the relationship, but why this relationship?
     
  6. Aug 7, 2004 #5
    Remember that the speed of photons is the constant c. The speed of any wave is equal to the wavelength times the frequency, so c = lf. (l = lambda, the wavelentgth, f is frequency). Rearranging, f = c/l. If E = hf for a photon, then E = hc/l. So energy increaes with smaller l (wavelength).

    Are you asking why c = lf, or why E = hf?
     
  7. Aug 8, 2004 #6

    mee

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    Sorry for my ignorance, but what is h and is time an integral part of f?
     
  8. Aug 8, 2004 #7
    Remember how light has properties of a wave (wave/particle duality)? Well that's what the wavelength is, the wavelength of the property aspect of the photon. This helps predict such outcomes as the interference pattern in double-slit experiments.
     
  9. Aug 20, 2004 #8

    mee

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    But is this property a variable pulsation or a movement side to side through space or both?
     
  10. Aug 20, 2004 #9

    selfAdjoint

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    The EM wave is a transverse vibration. No longitudinal component has ever been observed.
     
  11. Aug 20, 2004 #10
    Thanks self adjoint.

    Tidal Forces, Gravitational Waves

    http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/einstein/node5.html
     
  12. Aug 21, 2004 #11

    mee

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    I'm sorry but this doesn't answer my question very well. Could you explain a bit better? More details?
     
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