1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Simple question

  1. Aug 9, 2011 #1
    Given a simple equation y = y (t), where does maximum occur.

    I am thinking that this is an asymptote?

    is this a correct assumption?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 9, 2011 #2

    Mark44

    Staff: Mentor

    Without knowing the formula for your function, it is impossible to know where a maximum occurs or whether the function has an asymptote of any kind.
     
  4. Aug 9, 2011 #3
    This was the only information that i was provided with on the question sheet.
     
  5. Aug 9, 2011 #4

    Mark44

    Staff: Mentor

    Was there a graph included with the problem?
    In general, a maximum or minimum can occur at any of three places:
    1) a point where the derivative is zero.
    2) a point in the domain of the function at which the derivative is undefined.
    3) an endpoint of the domain of the function.
     
  6. Aug 9, 2011 #5
    actually this was all the information that was giving for this particular question.
     
  7. Aug 9, 2011 #6

    Char. Limit

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Well, firstly, what dictates a maximum? We know that for it to be a maximum, the slope at that point must be zero, so y'(t)=0. And furthermore, we know that the second derivative of y must be negative, so y''(t)<0. So the maximum is every point satisfying those two conditions.

    EDIT: Note that I am assuming that y(t) is continuous over the whole real line.
     
  8. Aug 9, 2011 #7
    y = -|x| isn't differentiable at its maximum.

    Edit: I see Mark basically mentioned this in 2) in his last post.
     
  9. Aug 9, 2011 #8

    Char. Limit

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Ah, touche. Let me revise my earlier statement to say that we assume y(t) AND y'(t) are continuous over the whole real line.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Simple question
  1. Simple Simple question (Replies: 1)

  2. Simple Question (Replies: 6)

  3. Simple Question (Replies: 19)

  4. Simple Question. (Replies: 3)

  5. Simple question (Replies: 4)

Loading...