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Simple Ratio?

  • Thread starter Mesmer
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A concrete column has a diameter of 350mm and a length of 2m. If the density (mass/volume) of concrete is [tex]2.45\frac{Mg}{m^3}[/tex]. determine the weight of the column in pounds

The answer to this problem is given as 1.04 kip not pounds like the question ask for, but that is not my problem. This seems like and probably is an easy problem to answer but I cant figure out what I'm doing wrong. Here is what I've done to solve this problem:

The first thing I did was change the Mg to Kg and the mm to m. No biggy.
The only other info I have is the dimension of the column. I used that to find the volume of the column [tex] V_c= \pi*r^2*h[/tex]. Then i just formed a simple ratio with the mass as my unknown. This method does not work for me. any Ideas.
 

Answers and Replies

cristo
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Science Advisor
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Did you remember to convert your mass into pounds?

Post your full solution if you're still having problems, as that's the only way we'll be able to see where you're going wrong!

edit: Also, did you note that mg≠Mg?
 
Last edited:
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Did you remember to convert your mass into pounds?

Post your full solution if you're still having problems, as that's the only way we'll be able to see where you're going wrong!

I did convert the mass to weight using Weight = (mass)(gravity)

radius= 150m
height=2m
density=[tex]2450\frac{kg} {m^3}[/tex]

Now all I have to do Is set up the ratio :[tex]2450\frac{kg}{m^3}=\frac{?}{0.141372m^3}[/tex]

Then I solved for the unknown (?) and converted that answer to lbs
 
Last edited:
cristo
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I did convert the mass to weight using Weight = (mass)(gravity)


Pounds are units of mass. There is a mistake in your question.

radius= 150m
height=2m
density=[tex]2450\frac{kg}{m^3}[/tex]
OK


Now all I have to do Is set up the ratio :[tex]2450\frac{kg}{m^3}=\frac{?}{0.141372m^3}[/tex]
I would write this as [tex]\rho=\frac{m}{V} \Rightarrow m=\rho V [/tex], where [itex]\rho[/itex] denotes density, m denotes mass, and V denotes volume.

Rearranging in terms of algebraic symbols is easier. Unfortunately, I get a different value for V than you. Show your calculation.

Then I solved for the unknown (?) and converted that answer to lbs
Ok, this should work, show your working!

edit: Kurdt spotted your mistake- I didn't read that properly!
 
Last edited:
Kurdt
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Where does the radius of 150m come from? A millimeter (mm) is one thousandth of a meter.

Also your method is wrong, do as cristo suggests and find the mass of the column then convert to pounds.
 
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I see what I did now. When I found the radius I used 0.150m instead of the correct 0.175m. Now I have it right :) Thank you.
 
cristo
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I see what I did now. When I found the radius I used 0.150m instead of the correct 0.175m. Now I have it right :) Thank you.
You're welcome, but please take onboard my point about algebraic expressions; it will help a lot in future study!
 

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