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Skier on ramp

  1. Sep 22, 2009 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    In a flying ski jump, the skier acquires a speed of 110 km/h by racing down a steep hill and then lifts off into the air from a horizontal ramp. Beyond this ramp, the ground slopes downward at an angle of 45 degrees. (a) Assuming the skier is in a free-fall motion after he leaves the ramp, at what distance down the slope will he land? (b) In actual jumps, skiers reach distances of up to 165m. Why does this not agree with the result you obtained in part (a)?


    2. Relevant equations
    vy= voy-gt
    y-yo= voyt + 1/2(ayt^2)


    3. The attempt at a solution
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 22, 2009 #2

    rl.bhat

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    Homework Helper

    Since the slope is 45 degrees, horizontal distance and the vertical fall are equal.. Find those quantities and equate them.
     
  4. Sep 22, 2009 #3
    I thought this looked like a projectile question. The question didn't mention a take of angle so looking at what was given I think that angle is horizontal so its 0 degrees.

    You need to vectorise everything two because this is a two dimensional question.
    The velocity of take off first- Vx= V Cos theta
    = 30.6 m/s
    and Vy= V Sin theta
    = 0
    Then substitute those values into the vector for distance in the x and y plane.
    The skier will hit the slopes when distancex/distance y= Tan -45 degrees and you'll find t the time it took to hit the hill.
    To find the downhill distance draw a triangle with x distance on the on the horizontal and y distance on the vertical and 50 degrees for their facing angle so x distance /Cos 50 should get you that distance.
    I came up with a huge figure. I get friction etc wasn't taken into account,
     
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