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Medical Sleep schedules

  1. Aug 3, 2011 #1
    I wasn't quite sure whether to put this here or is skepticism and debunking. Anyway here goes. I was reading the other day about this different way of sleeping that allows one to sleep just two hours a day. It is called the Uberman sleep schedule. Basically, one sleeps every 3-4 hours for 20-30 minutes and that is all the sleep that one requires. Read more on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyphasic_sleep" [Broken] for instance. Google to find more.) I was just wondering how true this is? I don't see any studies done on this.

    I found http://www.supermemo.com/articles/polyphasic.htm" [Broken] write-up that claimed otherwise and all this was a myth. I don't know what to make of it.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 1, 2011 #2
    From what I've heard of it, it's called the "Uberman" schedule or Polyphasic Sleep. It apparently allows you to sleep a bit less but remain at the same energy level. I would gladly have tried it if it wasn't for the fact that society isn't constructed around this schedule. I can't sleep every few hours at work/school; sorry won't happen. It's a neat idea though. Another reason I couldn't do it is because I will never let go of my green tea, and you simply can't have any caffeine when you're on the schedule since you're always going to sleep in 3:40.

    If you want an account of this:

    http://everything2.com/title/Uberman%27s+Sleep+Schedule


    Good luck, it is worth it if you can manage.
     
  4. Sep 1, 2011 #3
    The body has a natural affinity for sleeping in 9 hours blocks on a 24 hour cycle. This can't be broken and you will never truly adapt to a polyphasic pattern. While some people do have abnormal sleep, I wouldn't believe everything I read in blogs either.
     
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