Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Sleeping in snow

  1. Jan 7, 2006 #1
    Why we're more likely fall asleep when it's snowing(and you're outside getting stuck somewhere for heavy snow)? and why we should prevent ourselves from sleeping or else we'll die?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 7, 2006 #2

    berkeman

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    What do you mean exactly? Your question is kind of broad as stated.

    Are you asking mostly about hypothermia? Or more about relaxing snow scenes and sleep?
     
  4. Jan 7, 2006 #3
    about hypothermia!:redface:
     
  5. Jan 9, 2006 #4

    berkeman

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    I did a google search on hypothermia snow sleep, and got lots of interesting hits. I didn't read enough to find out why you get sleepy when cold (I'm sure it's in the hits), but I did find out why you shouldn't let yourself go to sleep. When you sleep, your body's metabolism slows down, and you don't produce as much body heat as when awake. Interesting....

    http://www.ext.nodak.edu/extpubs/ageng/safety/ae1237b.htm
     
  6. Jan 9, 2006 #5

    DocToxyn

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Hypothermia is a reduction in body core temperature that leads to loss of coordination, confusion, lowered metabolism and eventual death if not reversed. You don't necessarily feel sleepy and tired in the traditional sense, although you may because of other factors, exertion, etc. The process is really a gradual shut-down of your system and eventually this will lead to lack of blood/oxygen to vital areas and you will become unconscious and eventually die. The dulling of your mental facilities may lead to you to think you are tired and need sleep, but if you are not able to do this under conditions where you are no longer losing body heat, you may not survive. It doesn't even have to snowing for hypothermia to occur. Quite often it occurs in cool weather where people go out less prepared than they should be and they get wet/lost and die from exposure when it's only 50 F.
     
  7. Feb 1, 2006 #6
    thanks alot !
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Sleeping in snow
  1. Sleep and IQ (Replies: 5)

  2. Sleeping problem (Replies: 13)

  3. About Sleep (Replies: 1)

  4. Cipher in the snow (Replies: 3)

  5. Sleep Walking (Replies: 4)

Loading...