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Small question

  1. Nov 30, 2006 #1
    Ontario, Canada.
    Today I was escorted to the office of my school by my VP where there was a detective and another VP (not trying to be dramatic). Now to give you the info, my school about a month or two ago had a lockdown due to a believed intruder. So they show me some footage from the computer of me pacing and looking down a hallway (the reason why I was looking down the hallway is because some kid was trying to put paint on my shirt and I didn't want himt o come up behind me), I was also waiting for my next class. I tell her I was near my friends who were around the corner who were also in my class. By then I was really nervous because I thought they had the wrong idea. She then asks me other questions like did you see or hear anything suspicious I say no because I didn't. She also asks me could I see the door from where I am and she also asked for my friends names. She also mentioned the person that reported the intruder is being charged for lying about it.

    To make this shorter, she then asks me for my birthdate (possibly seeing my birthdate?), which is by the way 15. She then asks for my address and phone number and says she will be talking to my friends and she then says do not talk to your friends about this. I later then arrive home and after a while the phone rings and my mom picks up. I listen closely and I hear the detective say something like that she wants me to write a statement.

    I thought about it and the possible reason she wants my statement on how I noticed nothing odd is so that they can have evidence that the person who reported the intruder, did indeed lie.

    Should I write a statement or sign anything she gives me or is this going to be digging myself into a hole about something that I have no part in?

    BTW, sorry for the hard to read paragraphs.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 30, 2006 #2

    Evo

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    Your parents need to contact an attorney.
     
  4. Nov 30, 2006 #3
    I also hope you people don't think my parents are incompetant, I just havn't sat down with them yet and decided what to do.
     
  5. Nov 30, 2006 #4

    Claude Bile

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    Don't worry, it is quite impossible to get yourself in trouble by giving a statement unless you lie to them.

    Claude.
     
  6. Nov 30, 2006 #5

    Moonbear

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    The most important thing is to talk to your parents and make sure they accompany you for anything. You don't need to give a statement if you don't want to. I'm not sure it would help much anyway to just say you didn't see anything, since it doesn't necessarily prove there wasn't an intruder, just not one that you saw.

    I agree with Evo that if you do decide to sign a statement that you should have an attorney present. Mostly, just to make sure you don't write anything that could mean something different than what you really mean to say, and also to be sure you don't end up signing something with some sort of fine print you don't understand. You don't want to accidentally write something that could implicate you in the whole mess when you had nothing to do with it and are just trying to do a good deed.
     
  7. Dec 1, 2006 #6
    So I'm assuming its safe to say I should not sign a statement? Because of all honesty, I know nothing about it and I really do not want to get involved in something I have no part in.
     
  8. Dec 1, 2006 #7
    I would say that is a good option, yes. If you saw nothing, then don't worry about it. If they harrass you for a statement, tell your parents to contact an attorney and see what you can do.

    My reasoning behind this is that only frustration could result from it in my oppinion. If you did see something then it is a different story, it would be a good deed to report it. But all they want is you to be bound to your word legally. I wouldn't do it and just continue with your life!
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2006
  9. Dec 1, 2006 #8

    Moonbear

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    And that is a perfectly good way of stating your reasons for not signing the statement. It seems silly to get a statement from someone just saying they didn't witness anything. And, yeah, it could turn into a big hassle if they then want you to testify in court or something.

    If they don't go away after you say that, tell them to talk to your parents, not you. If you're under 18, they shouldn't be having any discussions with you without your parents present.
     
  10. Dec 1, 2006 #9
    Just to add to the other good advice:
    There is no reason why the statement you make (if you decide to make one) can't be written in the comfort of your own home with whoever you want present.
    You can then go over your statement for as long as you want to make sure it says exactly what you want it to say.
     
  11. Dec 1, 2006 #10

    JasonRox

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    My question is... who carries paint around to throw on people?

    Also, I think the big problem was looking down. When you do that, you look very suspicious.

    Anyways, I wouldn't sign anything. But then again, you're a young offender, so nothing will happen anyways if you did get busted for something you didn't do.

    So, to emphasive it, don't sign anything. If they say you have to sign it, then tell them they have to sign your statement that says that they said you have to sign it.
     
  12. Dec 1, 2006 #11

    JasonRox

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    In the comfort of your own you don't have a lawyer sitting there.

    Don't sign anything. Don't make a statement of any sort. The comfort of your own home doesn't mean you can rationally make a good one because you probably can't. They will twist your words around in ways you never thought possible, so don't even try. You can think you're smart, and good at writing, but in the world of law, everyone sucks at writing.

    I suspect that the detective is just praying on weak kids. Weak kids look down to the ground, so you got picked up. So, most likely the detective knows you didn't do it, but wants you to say you did because then the case is closed and he/she looks better on paper now.
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2006
  13. Dec 1, 2006 #12
    Jason take another look at the OP's post. W3tw1lly did not indicate they were looking down. The OP looked DOWN THE HALLWAY. I think what they want to know is whether or not W3tw1lly knows anything about an intruder. They are suspicious that the OP knew there was an intruder and was watching for him/her. They cannot possibly be so stupid as to think W3tw1lly actually is the intruder. One last thing, implying that W3tw1lly is a weak kid is pretty tactless.
     
  14. Dec 1, 2006 #13

    verty

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    Everyone sounds a little paranoid. They must justify why you must make the statement, why the law says you should. If the law doesn't say you should, then don't. Then don't take their word for it, look it up. The internet is a wonderful place. If you don't find the answer, pay someone on google answers or speak to an attorney.
     
  15. Dec 1, 2006 #14

    Chi Meson

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    I don't think they are trying to collar our Willie here. Contrary to myth, detectives are NOT in the business of simply closing cases. It seems that the case here is trying to prosecute the person who raised a false alarm.

    Signing a statement that says you didn't see anything will simply say just that. If the case goes forward, and perhaps goes to court, your signed statement might prevent the necessity of being subpoenaed.
     
  16. Dec 1, 2006 #15

    Office_Shredder

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    If you're just signing a statement that says you didn't see an intruder, I can't possibly see how you're digging yourself into a hole.
     
  17. Dec 2, 2006 #16
    Why were you in the hallways during a lockdown??
     
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