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Smelly feet and arm pits

  1. Dec 29, 2008 #1

    wolram

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    I know the smell is produced by bacteria, but will an odour less person live longer than a smelly one? the bacteria must rob some of the life force from a body?
     
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  3. Dec 29, 2008 #2

    mgb_phys

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    Bacteria on your skin are good for you.
    http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/eid/vol7no2/larson.htm

    Includes the advice that surgeons shouldn't shower before entering an operating theatre because it leaves clouds of bad bacteria around their body
     
  4. Dec 29, 2008 #3
    Another key question concerning life, universe and everything? Although bacteria may drain the bowl of life force (or mana), I doubt that non-stinky persons are free of bacteria.
     
  5. Dec 29, 2008 #4

    BobG

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    Yes. Married men live longer than unmarried men.

    Actually, it depends. To a certain extent, cleanliness means less illness. Taken to the extreme, as in all the antibacterial stuff people buy for their houses nowadays, it becomes a little unhealthy, as in mgb_phy's post. (although I'm not sure about the surgeon, since presumably, he scrubs in a fairly sterile environment right before entering the operating room - there shouldn't be a lot of bacteria to replace what he's scrubbed off).
     
  6. Dec 30, 2008 #5

    Monique

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    You've never done the test? Make a bacterial culture of your finger before and after washing your hands. After washing your hands with water and soap usually results in a higher amount of bacterial colonies, due to the opening of your pores. Surgeons use anti-bacterial substances to sterilize their hands during washing.

    I don't recommend using anti-bacterial substances in everyday live, as the bacteria living on your skin in normal circumstances are non-pathogenic and can actually be beneficial.
     
  7. Dec 31, 2008 #6
    I thought normal people don't do this kind of stuff but now could you tell us the proper way of cultivating bacteria?

    So what is the benefit of washing hands?
     
  8. Dec 31, 2008 #7

    wolram

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    I did a test when i went to hospital, there were 2 nurses with a little stand in the lobby.
    If i remember correctly, they gave me some jelly substance to rub on my hands, then they used a light to show the Bactria up, then they told me to go wash my hands which i did, (very thoroughly), they repeated the test and my hands were still lit up all over, so i had a lecture in hand washing, i walked away thinking that test was a load of cobblers, i work in the food industry, and we are shown how to wash our hands, there are even spot checks in the high care areas.
     
  9. Dec 31, 2008 #8

    Monique

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    I think this one of the first experiments you do when you take a microbiology class. You could try it at home by mixing gelatin with a bouillon cube, heat it to sterilize the solution, let it cool and make thumb imprints. Here is a recipe: http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/mole00/mole00472.htm The bacteria will like to grow at 37oC, but you can also leave it at room temperature (in which case it will take two days for colonies to appear).

    To wash off harmful bacteria that you picked up during the day (and other nasty stuff), the bacteria living in your pores are part of your natural flora.
     
  10. Dec 31, 2008 #9

    Monique

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    I don't think it was the bacteria that lighting up, but rather the jelly that you rubbed on your hands (I've never heard of such a test).
     
  11. Dec 31, 2008 #10
    In my experience, black lights can cause both a compound in urine (possibly the urea molecule) and compounds in soaps to light up. Some bateria may light up (be phosphorescent)... but I agree that the jelly might be the cause.... it may be even harder to remove than ordinary bacteria. (Reminds me of back in the days when our dentist gave us red pellets to chew to show us how poorly we brushed our teeth!)

    A long time ago, when I added a pet to my lease, the landlord can to inspect the carpet (pre-pet) with a black light. There was a big spot in from of my washer (where I'd spilled some detergent) that lit up like a rocket even though I'd tried to clean it our well, and there were some spots in the spare bedroom (where the prior tenants had kept a puppy... glad I picked that as the spare room, not my main room!) He never inspected it post-pet (although cha-cha's always been good :!!) )... since there was a flood due to a clog, and he was going to have to replace most of the carpet anyways.
     
  12. Dec 31, 2008 #11

    wolram

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    You most likely are right, it was a long time ago.
     
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