Smoothing with full wave rectification

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In summary, the conversation discusses how to produce a smooth voltage through full wave rectification, and the use of a capacitor to achieve this. Various tips and explanations are provided, such as using a different valued capacitor for optimal performance and the equation for calculating the necessary capacitance. The possibility of using a voltage regulator is also mentioned.
  • #1
IntuitioN
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Hi all!

Is it possible to produce a smooth(or almost smooth) voltage through full wave rectification? I know for half-wave, you can use a capacitor, but this doesn't seem to work for full wave.

Cheers
 
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  • #2
Sure it does. You may need to provide more information about what you are doing. IIRC, since a full wave rectifier has twice the ripple frequency of a half wave rectifier you will need to use a different valued cap for optimal performance.
 
  • #3
You don't need to use a different cap, but you can get by with a smaller one. That is what engineering is all about though, getting by with as little as possible and still having things work correctly.
 
  • #4
I think the diagram that I have attached achieves that, I did not test it properly in pspice though. The DC source represents your full wave rectification and the voltage across R1 should be smoothe enough
 

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  • #5
hi guys thanks for ur replies!

What i am trying to do is to produce a smooth voltage to power an xray tube. I am trying to convert the AC currect into a DC current then smooth the voltage out so that the peak voltage is effectively the average voltage.

Exequor: What is L1? I'm not very good at this so can you please explain a bit how your circuit works?

Cheers
 
Last edited:
  • #6
Go to my website www.abiscus.com and go to the rectified power supply link. On that page you'll find a PDF file explaining the theory behind rectification.

For a fullwave rectifier, the equation for the capacitor C is:

C = Vp / ( 2 * R * f * Vr )

where Vr is the voltage ripple, f is the frequency, R is the load resistance, and Vp is the peak voltage of the input.

As you can see, the larger the capacitance, the smaller the ripple voltage and the closer you will come to a smooth DC value.

You may also want to think about using a voltage regulator. This helps keep the DC voltage constant and further dampens the ripple.
 

Related to Smoothing with full wave rectification

What is smoothing with full wave rectification?

Smoothing with full wave rectification is a technique used in signal processing to remove high-frequency noise from a signal. It involves converting an alternating current (AC) signal to a direct current (DC) signal by taking the absolute value of the signal, resulting in a smoother and more stable output.

How does smoothing with full wave rectification work?

In smoothing with full wave rectification, the input signal is first passed through a diode, which only allows the positive portion of the signal to pass through. The resulting signal is then passed through a low-pass filter to remove any remaining high-frequency noise. This results in a DC signal with reduced noise and fluctuations.

What are the benefits of using smoothing with full wave rectification?

Smoothing with full wave rectification is effective in reducing high-frequency noise and fluctuations in a signal, resulting in a more stable and accurate output. It is also a simple and cost-effective method compared to other noise reduction techniques.

What are the limitations of smoothing with full wave rectification?

One limitation of smoothing with full wave rectification is that it only works on signals with positive values, so it cannot be used on signals with both positive and negative values. Additionally, it may distort the signal if the noise is too high or if the low-pass filter is not properly designed.

Where is smoothing with full wave rectification commonly used?

Smoothing with full wave rectification is commonly used in electronics, telecommunications, and other fields where signals need to be filtered and noise needs to be reduced. It is also used in power supplies to convert AC signals to DC signals for electronic devices.

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