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So do you risk talking to her about fat?

  1. Aug 24, 2010 #1
    I mean when she's what 6,7, 8, or 9 or even earlier. Or do you just say nothing about it and just let whatever happen, happen or even worst, handle it improperly throughout her adolescent life?

    It's quite a bit more than just talking about it once of course. Gotta' guide her along a healthy path without upsetting her, like for example having very little junk food in the house, and not making a big deal about it. Delicate operation for sure and things could go horribly wrong. Still though, I'd risk explaining to her just what's involved with . . . being fat.

    Would you?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 24, 2010 #2

    alt

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    What's delicate ? Why not upset her ?

    Two ways to ensure your kids don't get fat;

    1) Have good fresh food in the house - minimal junk food
    2) Get them involved in a very physical sport from those early ages you mentioned

    It worked for my four.

    But to answer your question. My 20 year old daughter left her sport a few years ago, when she finished school. She thus became much less active, though still very busy in her new job, studies, etc.

    About a year ago she statred looking decidedly plumb.

    "You're getting FAT, girl - get yourself out - go for a jog, join a gymn - do something or soon, there'll be two of you"

    Hounded her several times in this way. About a month later, she was jogging, gymn, etc. Back to looking a stunner !
     
  4. Aug 24, 2010 #3

    lisab

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    I appreciate the delicacy of the situation. From the sounds of alt's post, his household is more of a rough-and-tumble style. Not every family is like that.

    What age of kid are we talking about? It's quite normal for girls to plump up in the year before they go through adolescence.

    Also, at the risk of being insensitive - what's your own physical condition, and that of other family members (especially mom)? It's going to be hard to harp on a kid about a few extra pounds if you have some to shed, as well.
     
  5. Aug 24, 2010 #4

    alt

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    No, not at all - my family is very well ordered and functional - no rough and tumble, other than in fun. I simply but firmly beleive you will do more damage to a childs mentality in hiding a problem for fear of damaging them, than confronting it. Small pain up front verses years of mumbo jumbo !

    Agree wholeheartedly with your last sentence.

    Here's another major tip about kids;

    Rather than do as you say, they will do as they see you do !
     
  6. Aug 24, 2010 #5
    I'm referring to very young girls of course, when you can really have an impact on her, like before 13 or so. The danger of course is if you handle it poorly and she develops an eating disorder.

    But it's important for mom and dad to have healthy habits too. However, I think even that, some girls will become overweight no matter what you do. Have to be willing to accept that if it happens and not put pressure on her to "get skinny" and only make it worst because often they can't loose the weight (permanently) unless they take drastic measures.

    It's a serious issue for girls, the fat thing. I believe mom and dad should really try and address it starting at a very young age but delicately.
     
  7. Aug 24, 2010 #6

    lisab

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    'Rough and tumble' is a poor choice of words on my part, I don't mean physically abusive. More like how you describe - honesty and openness...and not a lot of tact, maybe :smile:. Lots of families have that sort of culture, I don't think it's bad at all.

    A well-adjusted 20-year-old may be OK with being warned about getting fat; such a direct warning would probably not work as well with a girl as young as 6, though.
     
  8. Aug 24, 2010 #7

    alt

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    Cool - I didn't for a moment think you meant physically abusive :-)

    Agree with your last.
     
  9. Aug 24, 2010 #8

    turbo

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    I have a neighbor who is quite overweight, and she has two daughters 5 and 7. Their grandfather built them a huge playground with timber-framed swing-set, slide, monkey bars, and balance equipment. They are very active little girls and they are not even a little bit overweight. They are also aware of the complications that obesity can entail, since their great-grandmother and great-grandfather are diabetic. They are too young for lectures, IMO, but they are not too young to exercise by having fun, or to learn good eating habits. When my wife and I have them down here and it's snack-time, snacks are often cherry tomatoes, carrot sticks, cucumber spears, with low-fat dressings to dip them in. They love it. Their grandfather has peach, plum, and apple trees on the property so at this time of the year, the kids can have fresh fruit anytime without raiding the 'fridge.
     
  10. Aug 24, 2010 #9

    DaveC426913

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    I would say this is by far the exception rather than the rule. 99% of the time this will backfire.

    1] Parents especially should never criticize a child's weight. There is no end to the lineup of adults whose issues can be traced back to parents who criticized their appearance, even lovingly.

    2] If you really feel you must intervene, then lead by example, or at least directly facilitate. Sign up at a gym yourself doing something fun. Get them interested in the social or play aspect of it. Get them into a sport. If not yourself, then try to facilitate them having friends to go with. Drive them, get them equipment, pay for everything. Make it an enjoyable experience.
     
  11. Aug 24, 2010 #10
    I won't even introduce my kids to junk food. If they don't know about junk food, they can't be disappointed with cantaloupe. The sweetest thing they'll be eating will be a banana, and even then they won't be able to finish it, because it's too sweet compared to the usual celery they're going to be eating. For breakfast, there will be no Lucky Charms, there will be plain oatmeal and maybe some raisins in it, if they've behaved. They won't even know donuts and ice cream exist, so they'll be happy.
     
  12. Aug 24, 2010 #11

    lisab

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    That's exactly how I raised my daughter, and it worked...until kindergarten. The day before she started school, she couldn't get through a cupcake because it was too sweet; by first grade she was no different from the other kids. Because every birthday or holiday, there would be "treats" brought in for the kids. The very fact that crap food was called "treats" says a *lot*!

    But we still didn't eat a lot of sweets at home, and that's far more influential, imo.
     
  13. Aug 24, 2010 #12

    Evo

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    I wouldn't talk about body image and tell someone that young that putting on weight will make them fat = ugly and unwanted.

    Is this your own child you're talking to? Some other children? That makes a difference. If it's your own child, that's simple, you cook healthy, and explain to them the requirements (calories, food choices, exercise) that makes a healthy body and the benefits of maintaining a healthy body. Make it about feeling good and being healthy, never about appearance and acceptance.
     
  14. Aug 24, 2010 #13

    DaveC426913

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    My first thought was: "leroy has kids?"
    My second thought was: "Not a chance. If he did, he'd be saying exactly what lisab said."

    jackmell, this is the best advice.
     
  15. Aug 24, 2010 #14
    Let me start out by saying that I used to be really fat. In elementary school all the way up to the high school I was always known as "that fat kid". It wasn't until I started being out of the house and became independent that I started to lose weight and get in shape.

    When I was young my mother would always tell me I was fat and that I needed to lose weight and sometimes just flat out yell at me. She would try and force me into doing things like karate or fat camp or something like that. Then she would go grocery shopping and fill the kitchen with garbage like hot pockets and soda and do absolutely nothing in terms of exercise. Once I grew up and started being on my own I dropped the weight pretty fast and started living a healthy lifestyle. Now she complains that I'm too skinny and eat too healthy! :grumpy:

    My point is set an example. Do you eat healthy? Do you exercise on a regular basis? What kind of foods do you keep in the house? Generally fat parents have fats kids, and its not because of genetics. If you want your kids to have a healthy lifestyle you should teach by example, not by lecture.
     
  16. Aug 24, 2010 #15

    DaveC426913

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    And again.
     
  17. Aug 24, 2010 #16

    Gokul43201

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    And if you can't teach by example, teach by Colbert: http://www.colbertnation.com/the-co...2010/tip-wag---baby-gap--dick-cheney---plants
     
  18. Aug 24, 2010 #17
    But fat does equal ugly and unwanted in many parts of American society. However, the effect is often hidden and implicit but it's there nevertheless. I'm just being realistic. It's cruel but true.

    Yes I would engage my daughter at six or so and start talking to her not only about the health part but also about the social problems it causes. However I didn't but she's always been skinny so didn't have the problem.

    But what about the parents that do have children that are overweight? It's heartbreaking for them I believe to see their child suffering (because of how society treats them) especially the girls. For example, I'm sitting outside the bank and this fat girls walks out the door and just looks down as she passes me by. Well, I don't expect all women to look at me but I could tell from her face and expression that she thought, "I'm too fat for you to be interested in me". That seriously hurts a woman and they hide it well.

    I am utterly convinced that those parents that watch the suffering their overweight daughters go through, would say, "yes Jack, if only I knew, I would have risked it and started to talk to her about a girls appearance early, even at four, and would have taught her (gently), and led by example so that she may not have become overweight because I know how much it hurts her."
     
  19. Aug 24, 2010 #18

    turbo

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    I think placing an emphasis on body-image in the minds of young children can be destructive, leading to eating disorders and self-esteem problems. Better to give them a good balanced diet and encourage lots of physical activities than to implant negatives (If you get fat, people will think less of you.) in their minds. You don't even have to accentuate the "health" aspects if you get them into good habits early.
     
  20. Aug 24, 2010 #19

    Gokul43201

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    How far would you want your daughter to go to conform to the pressures of societal norms? And why?

    For instance, would you encourage her to conform to the cruel reality that she will probably be branded a geek and might never have any "cool friends" if she aces all her subjects in middle/high school?
     
  21. Aug 24, 2010 #20
    I don't get it why people are dandying girls so much while if this was about getting a boy to start exercising people would just tell you to tell him the truth. I think a huge reason why the disparages between the sexes are so large is because just about everyone is treating girls as if they were more delicate than boys, both emotionally and physically.

    Look, they only develop things like eating disorders if they are not secure with who they are. If they aren't depending on others to like them they wont do that. But somehow many girls have gotten the idea that if they only look good enough they will be popular which isn't true at all. Even the best looking of girls aren't that popular if they are totally insecure and got nothing else that is interesting.

    What you should teach the girl is that getting into shape is a really good investment for life. People treat you better if you are in shape, you will feel better and be happier if you are in shape and you live longer as an extra bonus. But it isn't the key to become popular, that is about their personality and attitude more than anything else.
    That isn't true, you can ace all of your subjects without being called a geek in most places, as I said it is more about your attitude and personality more than anything else. People who put a lot of weight on education are called geeks and that isn't strange at all and it doesn't matter if those people ace tests or not, but you can ace all tests without really thinking that it is important either and then you wont get called a geek.
     
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