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Software for relativity?

  1. Aug 15, 2010 #1
    When checking results, solving a problem, simulating a problem etc in relativity, what software do you tend to use?

    cheers,

    Jason
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 15, 2010 #2

    George Jones

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    GRTensorII.
     
  4. Aug 15, 2010 #3

    bcrowell

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    Maxima with the ctensor package is free and open source, and it does all the things I've wanted to do. Lots of examples here: http://www.lightandmatter.com/genrel/

    Cadabra is a package designed for coordinate-independent calculations.
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2010
  5. Aug 15, 2010 #4

    Mentz114

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    Do you mean Maxima ( and its interfaces wxMaxima and xMaxima ) ?
     
  6. Aug 15, 2010 #5

    bcrowell

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    Ugh -- yeah, I meant maxima, not mathematica. Thanks for the correction! I've edited my post to correct it.
     
  7. Aug 15, 2010 #6

    Mentz114

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    My pleasure.

    If the OP is interested I have a number of useful scripts for GR calculations, covariant differentiation and other stuff.
     
  8. Aug 16, 2010 #7
    Thanks for the replies so far which will have been useful to people reading this thread. When transforming the user defined world lines of a set of particles in one frame to another, would you be advised to use Mathematica, Maple, C++, Java, etc?

    To any students or university researchers in particular, what are your main programming languages?
     
  9. Aug 16, 2010 #8

    bcrowell

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    Are these world-lines defined numerically or algebraically? Do you want the result of the transformation expressed numerically, or algebraically? Maxima and GRTensorII are computer algebra systems.
     
  10. Aug 16, 2010 #9
    Numerically would be fine. Even better would be defining the paths the particles take in space either algebraically or numerically as a function of time in one frame, and then seeing how they move in different frames graphically.
     
  11. Aug 16, 2010 #10

    bcrowell

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    Numerically and algebraically are two totally different ball-games. A lot of people use MATLAB for numerical stuff. The open-source equivalent is Octave.
     
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