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Featured Stargazing Solar imaging and techniques

  1. Feb 7, 2018 #121

    davenn

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    07 Feb 2018, The Sun in Ha ....
    Lunt LS60THa, ASI 1600MM camera and SharpCap software.
    These are single frame images (no stacking)


    finally a reasonable spot group. The best for many months

    ab.jpg

    aa.jpg

    ac.jpg


    cheers
    Dave
     
  2. Feb 10, 2018 #122

    davenn

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    10 Feb 2018, The Sun in Ha .... The very respectable sunspot group ( largest for at least 4 months) has moved further onto the disk and is displaying some good details. Lunt LS60THa, ASI 1600MM camera and SharpCap software. These are single frame images (no stacking)

    180210 Cap_014sm.jpg


    the second image is closeup of the active region, the best for some months, the black sunspots can be seen along with the bright areas of flaring between them

    180210 Cap_026.jpg


    cheers
    Dave
     
  3. Mar 2, 2018 #123

    davenn

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    The Sun in Ha, 3 March 2018

    Been a couple of weeks since I last got a chance to do some solar observing/imaging some Ha images from today. One very large prominence and some filaments .... Lunt LS60THa and a ASI1600MM camera

    180303 Cap001sm.jpg

    180303 Cap005sm.jpg

    180303 Cap014sm.jpg

    180303 Cap027.jpg


    Dave
     
  4. Mar 3, 2018 #124
    Awesome!
    Some colour next time? (I like both)
     
  5. Mar 6, 2018 #125

    davenn

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    hi guys and gals

    for those interested in solar observations and imaging, I have found a very useful tool for determining the size of
    features on the sun eg. sunspots, filaments and prominences etc

    I present the Solar Ruler, available here .....
    https://samuelastronomy.wordpress.com/tag/solar-ruler/

    there is an English version here .....
    http://thesolarexplorer.net/index.php/tutorial/article2/article2/the-solar-ruler
    the download link is right at the bottom of the page

    This is a PDF file that you load into your fav image processing program that is able to support the manipulation of layers when combined

    For me, I use Photoshop (PS). I load in my solar image and I load in this PDF file they are in separate tabs at the top of the image viewing area

    I resize the solar ruler image to equal the size of my solar image as close as possible, then I copy it and paste it over the top of the solar image.
    I then use the move function to move the solar ruler image around so I can align it with the solar image to produce this result

    Solar image is the first image from my previous post ........

    NOTE: the image is seriously reduced in size and quality to be able to post on this forum

    180303 Cap0012asm.jpg


    You can see I managed to get the solar and ruler image sizes to match reasonably well

    I can now quickly determine the approx. size of that big prominence .... ~ 60,000 - 65,000 km in height above the suns disk !!

    Quite impressive
    hope some finds this useful :smile:

    Dave
     
  6. Mar 6, 2018 #126
    Some day I hope (for me) ... . Sounds like great tool!
    Ah, a bit less than twice the perimeter of the earth! ... Ok, No big deal! ... :oldlaugh: :oldbiggrin: :-p
     
  7. Mar 6, 2018 #127

    davenn

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    perimeter isn't the important measurement, it is almost 5x the diameter .... that's the important value

    remember we are looking at length of prominence say 60,000km round figures
    diameter of the Earth 12,700 km round figures. The Earth fits INTO that prominence 4.7x ( 5x if you go out to the 65,000km measurement)

    Three Earths side by side will fit through that dark centre part of the loop....

    180303 Cap027.jpg


    now that is significant :smile:

    Dave
     
  8. Mar 6, 2018 #128
    I think it's significant anyway! Also it's ~ 1/6 of the distance Earth-Moon ! ...
    [The "no big deal" was a joke ...]

    (+ light takes about 1/5sec to travel it! ... That means relatively HUGE distance! ...)
     
  9. Apr 10, 2018 #129

    davenn

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    Haven't been able to do any solar imaging for a bit over a month, mainly due to cloudy skies and or lack of activity on the sun
    I could have imaged last Saturday 7th April very clear sky and some good prominences.
    Only problem was that it was 35C outside and the heat was unbearable to be in for more than a few minutes,
    let alone the amount of time to set up the scope and computer and do imaging. That would have taken at least 30mins,
    28 - 29 mins more than I was prepared to endure :frown:

    How does an astronomer overcome bad condition "blues" ...... buy some more gear :smile::biggrin:

    So here is my new scope .... A Skywatcher EVOSTAR120 Black Diamond refractor
    120mm objective lens and a 1000mm focal length giving a f-stop of 8.3
    f-stop (ratio) = FL / aperture = 1000 / 120 = 8.33333....

    It's been around 45 years since I last owned a refractor scope (discounting finder scopes)
    This scope will get used for visual observing and imaging of solar, planetary, lunar and deep space
    The camera in the photos below is the ZWO ASI 1600MM

    Visual observing setup ... eyepiece and diagonal....

    IMG_1299sm.jpg

    visible light imaging.....

    IMG_1300sm.jpg

    Solar Ha imaging through a Daystar Chromospheric filter.....

    IMG_1301sm.jpg

    close-up of the filter and imaging setup......

    IMG_1304sm.jpg



    cheers
    Dave
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2018
  10. Apr 10, 2018 #130

    sophiecentaur

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    Hi @davenn Nice stuff. Sorry to hear about the weather. It would be nice to have a bit of Sun 'up here' too.
    How easy is it to shift that 120mm refractor about? I have a lumpy 8" Newtonian and it's a pain to get it up and onto the mount. No wonder I tend to use my 80mm Equinox nearly all the time. I look around me and 'everyone' seems to be buying or making garden observatories which solve the lifting problem. But the only suitable site for one in my garden is too much in the faces of people using the garden for non astronomical purposes.
     
  11. Apr 10, 2018 #131

    davenn

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    cheers :smile:

    lots of sun, but it's been mainly during the week days when I am at work and now that we are getting well into autumn, the days are getting shorter and daylight saving ended easter weekend so the sun is too low in the west for me to observe by the time I get home from work.
    Weekends are my only chances for solar observing now.



    quite light :smile: the tube, mounting rings and that green mounting bar total around 5.5kg

    yeah, I know that feeling with my Celestron 9.25" Schmitt-cass .... It's quite heavy


    a home observatory is out of the question for me
    1... primary reason ... I'm renting the property
    2... I'm deep in the red zone of light pollution for doing nite time astronomy :frown:

    Back in NZ, I had a 2.5 x 2.5m garden shed obs. that I made the roof roll off


    just googled it, nice looking scope:smile: does your one have the 10:1 Crayford fine focuser ?
    http://www.skyatnightmagazine.com/review/telescopes/sky-watcher-equinox-80-ed-apo


    cheers
    Dave
     
  12. Apr 10, 2018 #132

    sophiecentaur

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    Can't win 'em all. It's not too bad here as there are no street lamps and the only pollution is from some garden lighting next door (she is security mad). My astrophotography efforts are put to shame by some club members who live close into London. The worse the conditions, the more nerdy you have to be. My problem is I have problems with the cold and laziness, limited budget and some other spending priorities. Some of your solar pictures are good justification for your spending, though.
    BTW, what sort of solar energy rejection filter can you use with your 120mm? I thought there were limits to objective sizes for 'rear end' filtering. I have a shiny Baader filter for my 80mm objective but that is a poor man's solution to solar, I think.
     
  13. Apr 10, 2018 #133
    Lol ... That always works, doesn't it?
     
  14. Apr 10, 2018 #134
    Nice choice, Skywatcher has been known to put out some good equipment for a reasonable price. I actually just purchased my first refractor a few weeks ago: a Skywatcher esprit 80mm. But of course, I haven't had a clear night since I bought it!:frown:
     
  15. Apr 11, 2018 #135

    davenn

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  16. Apr 11, 2018 #136

    davenn

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    grrrr .... been there too in days gone by

    yup, that's where you can use some of narrow band filters .... they give weird colours but still give awesome results in heavily light polluted areas
    I haven't gone that path as yet. I just travel around an hour out of the city area to get to darker areas.


    cheers :smile:

    For the Daystar Quark as shown in my photo above, it can handle up to 150mm objective before a ERF is needed
    I bought the 120mm scope rather than the 102mm with the thought that I can always stop it down to ~ 100mm. This would still give a 40mm improvement over the Lunt 60mm scope and it would also kick the f-ratio up a bit to improve image sharpness over it's f8.3 @ 120mm

    The Baader filters are good white light filters and I will still use my one for sunspot imaging ( not that there are many of them lately .... solar minimum)


    Dave
     
  17. Apr 12, 2018 #137
  18. Apr 13, 2018 #138

    davenn

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  19. Apr 13, 2018 #139

    davenn

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    The Sun in Ha 13 Apr 2018

    Been off work all week with a not nice case of bronchitis, am feeling very unwell :frown:
    but did decide to haul the gear out today and do some solar imaging
    Reasonably quiet, 4 or 5 small filaments across lower part of disk, 2 groups of prominences on opposite limbs.
    The new active region has moved further onto the disk and is showing an associated filament ...
    The seeing conditions were better than yesterday
    Lunt LS60THa, ZWO ASI1600MM and SharpCap capture software

    180413 Ha Cap02sm.jpg

    180413 Ha Cap12.jpg

    180413 Ha Cap16.jpg

    180413 Ha Cap22.jpg




    Cheers
    Dave
     
  20. Apr 13, 2018 #140

    sophiecentaur

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    Yes. That one looks like mine. It'svery nice. A great (some might say too blingy) finish and focuses well. The rotatable focuser could be better, though. A lot of manual filter changing and suchlike could perhaps make it come loose.
     
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