[solved] Os

  • Thread starter damgo
  • Start date

What OS do you use the most?

  • Windows 2000/XP

    Votes: 32 44.4%
  • Windows 95/98/ME

    Votes: 19 26.4%
  • Linux

    Votes: 12 16.7%
  • Other UNIX

    Votes: 1 1.4%
  • MacOS X

    Votes: 8 11.1%
  • Older MacOS

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Other

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    72
  • #26
57
0
Originally posted by Viper
The worst is ME, It broke after 10 hours for god sake
I have to agree!! I am a Technician and work with 98/ME/XP/2000
and find XP to be the most stable and ME to be the most unstable. 2000 is also pretth good but I have to say that the user interface of XP is the selling point for me!
 
  • #27
I use Linux almost exclusively. I have a Slackware firewall and a few RedHat boxes which I use GNOME on when I need a GUI. I also have a windows 2000 workstation I use for games.

-Galen
 
  • #28
34
0
Originally posted by HBar
For example, when you want to install a program no longer can you just double click the icon and click the next button, you have to compile then install (it's actually pretty easy, but is a lot harder than the setup wizards when you run into a compile problem... ugh).
Wrong.

For RedHat, Mandrake etc. the package management tool (RPM) is actually quite a bit like Window's executables. I won't comment on dependency issues, but just because you're a Slackware user, doesn't mean all distros require you to compile programs in order to use them. A lot don't, although I know of at least one that requires you to compile everything (Gentoo). I've heard nightmare stories about taking 18+ hours to get a functional system with Gentoo, although I do think they have precompiled binaries in some cases.

I use Debian, though. Compiling is basically a forgotten art for me since I only have to remember a few commands to install programs. The downfall, for some people (especially those on faster computers) is that Debian pretty much only uses precompiled binaries based on i386. However, Debian does have support for at least 10 architectures (including, but not limited to: PPC, Alpha, x86.. etc.) There is the rare case that an application you want isn't in the Debian repository and you may have to compile it yourself, but it isn't too common. There are usually sources available for most popular applications. If you do want to compile and optimize for your system, you can always download the source (via apt-get) and build it to your specifications.

For good measure, here are some of my screenshots (using Gnome and Debian unstable):

http://www.double-helix.org/screenshots/peeps.jpg

http://www.double-helix.org/screenshots/helixanime.jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #29
67
0
Wrong.
When i said that you have to compile the programs i was talking about linux in general. Linux by itself doesn't have any built in package functionality (such as RPM, slackware package managment, etc).
-HBar
 
  • #30
34
0
Originally posted by HBar
Linux by itself doesn't have any built in package functionality (such as RPM, slackware package managment, etc).
??

Linux, by itself, doesn't even really exist. It's basically just a kernel. Anything more than that is a distribution. All Linus works on is the kernel. Perhaps I'm not understanding your statement, though, but as far as I know, all distributions have some form of package management, which makes your statement.. not make sense. Even if it's just compiling and using chkinstall to keep track of applications, there is *something* managing it. It was misleading of you to claim that apps need to be compiled. I just wanted to clarify that for people new to linux.
 
  • #31
67
0
Sorry, what wasn't phrased very well. What i meant was that linux in general doesn't have a package management system. Sure some of the distros do like redhat, slackware, debian, etc but not all of them. For example, i'm pretty sure the floppy version of keeper linux and smoothwall don't have a package managment system. I'm not completely sure, though.
-HBar
 
  • #32
91
0
floppy version of keeper linux and smoothwall don't have a package managment system.
Keeper doesn't, I've never looked through smoothwall, however.

And Hello, since this is my first post. I mainly use XP at the moment, but I have 4 other computers running various things. 3.1 and RedHat are the main other OSs.
 
  • #33
156
2
I use XP at school and since I started my job in the physics and mathematics lab, I've used XP ALOT more.

However...

I still have 98 at home and I still find it useful for the tasks I need to perform. So I'll quote the heading of the guitar lessons of Angus of AC/DC in Guitar World magazine: "If it ain't broken, why fix it?"
 
  • #34
91
0
My 98 machine is so (in your words) broke. XD The thing crashes every day. I've had it for 3 years, and it's been on for *most* of that time, never having been reinstalled.

The poor thing is ready to blow up, I think. ;)
 
  • #35
Xerxes
Slackware linux. And I've got to say, its awesome. Extremely fast, very customizable and has this festive feel to it.

I've had some major headaches trying to compile and install some programs, but its worth it. And in the end I have one of the most powerful systems in the neighborhood.
 
  • #36
32
0
For me it's Solaris 8 (on an old Ultra 5) and that's because I haven't bought any new hardware recently to build a new, faster i386 arch machine. Thus I'm stuck with this for now as my main workstation.

I run Debian as well, but that's on my old 333MHz CPU that works only as the firewall workhorse. I Don't want to bog it down with running X.

<sigh> Ultra 5's framebuffer leaves much to be desired, I'm afraid. I have to run the M64 Graphics Accelerator in 1024x768x60 resolution to keep 24-bit TrueColor. Alas no 1280x1024 for me.

...Unless anyone knows a way around this ...that would be nice :wink:
 
  • #37
22
0
I use win 98se for almost every thing and then use Redhat for the rest. Linux needs to be more user friendly. The fact that redhat won't play mp3's out of the box or many games is a problem for them.
 
  • #38
dduardo
Staff Emeritus
1,890
3
oh, boy. is it that hard to go to the xmms website and download the mp3 plugin.

If your unhappy with redhat, try debian
 
  • #39
22
0
Most users won't know how to do that. It's stupid that redhat has that problem. I have debian cds right now. I'm going to use it on my next pc and I also use Knoppix STD
 
  • #40
1
0
I use XP, also sometimes when I need, use 98SE.
 
  • #41
34
0
Originally posted by Tweek
I use win 98se for almost every thing and then use Redhat for the rest. Linux needs to be more user friendly. The fact that redhat won't play mp3's out of the box or many games is a problem for them.
It isn't stupid. It's a patent issue. From the xmms website:

Redhat 8 shipped without support for mpeg audio due to concerns about patents.

FWIW, Windows doesn't ship with Winamp.
 
  • #42
I like XP. It hasn't crashed. It's pretty stable.

I constantly hear how linux is great etc..etc...it's kinda annoying, but for the average Joe Luser who doesn't care to know what these terms are: patch your kernel, update your rpm's, check your version dependencies. It would be just too much aggravation and frustration on their part to use Linux.
 
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