Some equation, do it make sense without being explained?

  • Thread starter Einstiensqd
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In summary, the conversation discusses the variables t, s, and E and their possible meanings in relation to Einstein's equation, E=mc^2. The participants also suggest alternative equations and equations that they have created themselves. The conversation ends with a reminder that creativity and hard work are required to make significant contributions to physics.
  • #1

Einstiensqd

t=sE^2
I won't explain it until someone gets close enough and I will private message them what it means...
 
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  • #2
Well what's the point in this? [?] Are s, t, and E all variables? Do they in any way resemble their proper symbols? A few equations of the form a = bc^2 come to mind.
 
  • #3
Easy, that's Einstien's equation with different letters for the variables.

t= energy
s= speed of light
e= mass

:wink:
 
  • #4
close, but not quite. t is a constant though
 
  • #5
t=the speed of light
s=energy
e=energy
 
  • #6
opps, I mean e=mass
 
  • #7
okay here we go:

t = c = [squ](E/m) where E is energy and m is mass
s = [squ]E where is again energy
e = 1/[squ]m where m is again mass

if you rearrange this it yields E=mc2
 
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  • #8
t=chronological constant
s= mass of all space
E=potential and kinetic energy of all space
sE^2=warping mass and energy together
you get the chronological constant(second by second)
I put it as squared 'cause that was the only way to warp it, at least in sybols
Now, mabeye it is t=s+E, or t=sE, or t=sE^3! Yes! now it is accuratley adjusted to existing in a three-dimensional world, however, if volume is a dimension,(not a concept) t=sE^4.
 
  • #9
I seriously hope you're under the age of 12.

- Warren
 
  • #10
Originally posted by Einstiensqd
t=chronological constant
s= mass of all space
E=potential and kinetic energy of all space
sE^2=warping mass and energy together
you get the chronological constant(second by second)
I put it as squared 'cause that was the only way to warp it, at least in sybols
Now, mabeye it is t=s+E, or t=sE, or t=sE^3! Yes! now it is accuratley adjusted to existing in a three-dimensional world, however, if volume is a dimension,(not a concept) t=sE^4.

So in other words, your "chronological constant" is measured in units of

Kg³m4/sec4 or

g³cm4/sec4?

What's it supposed to stand for?
 
  • #11
Einsteinsqd: You are talking nonsense and you are saying it badly.


I agree with chroot: "I seriously hope you're under the age of 12."

Although that might be insulting to twelve year olds.
 
  • #12
Just to point out, he is a sixth grader, so he ought to be pretty close to twelve years old.
 
  • #13
I know. It really is insane, farfetched, and stupid that I try to make a formula out of nothing, but I just did that because I wanted to find some formula for the equivelence of space and time. Words can not express the embaressment of my stupidity to try something so ridiculous and actually post it. I do want to express a theory that might change everything, but I think I sould give it up, given the little factual support, or theoretical support.
 
  • #14
Einstiensqd - any of us at Physics Forums would love to discover an equation fundamental to physics or mathematics. Invention, however is "99% perspiration and 1% inspiration." Once you have a considerable body of science under your hat, creative coincidences come more and more often. What you might learn from the above responses is that if you truly love physics, you will find satisfaction whether you match Einstein (correct spelling) or relate physics to the novice. In truth, the simpler the physics, the more profound your insight.
 
  • #15
(lol) I knew someone would eventualy correct my spelling! Grammer just isn't my cup of tea.
 
  • #16
(Spelled "grammar", it has more to do with sentence structure than spelling.)
 

1. What is the equation and what does it represent?

The equation refers to a mathematical representation of a relationship between different variables. It is used to solve problems and make predictions based on the given information.

2. How do I know if an equation makes sense without being explained?

An equation makes sense when the variables and their relationships are clearly defined and the units of measurement are consistent. It should also follow the basic rules of mathematics, such as the order of operations.

3. Can an equation be correct but not make sense?

In some cases, an equation may be mathematically correct but not make sense in the context of the problem or real-world applications. It is important to always consider the practicality and reasonableness of an equation.

4. How can I check the accuracy of an equation?

The best way to check the accuracy of an equation is to plug in different values for the variables and see if the results match the expected outcome. You can also compare the equation to known values or use mathematical proofs to verify its correctness.

5. Are all equations created equal?

No, not all equations are created equal. Some equations may be more complex and require a deeper understanding of mathematical concepts, while others may be simpler and easier to understand. It is important to carefully consider the source and context of an equation before using it for any calculations or predictions.

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