Somebody needs your advice

  • Thread starter string_theory
  • Start date
In summary, if you have a deep interest in physics and are good at math, you can try to switch to physics as a career. However, this is a very personal decision and you should consider a variety of factors, including financial resources, enjoyment of the subject, and previous experience in the field.
  • #1
I am an electrical engineering student...

but I have a deep interest in physics...
what would you advice me to do?
 
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  • #2
Originally posted by string_theory
I am an electrical engineering student...
but I have a deep interest in physics...
what would you advice me to do?

Follow your own lead.

You can keep physics as a hobby, or try to switch to it. You will find examples of people that successfully jumped from EE or Computer Eng into Physics, as well as the other way around. Some may have had an extremely hard time, some may tell you not to switch, some may encourage you as if that was a magic way to happiness...

You cannot base this on statistics. It is an important personal decision.

That said, here are some things to consider:

- How good you are at math (physics' math, of course, as opposed to EE's math)
- How much do you love this stuff? (would it be enough for you to teach it? to read about it? to write about it?)
- Where are you on EE (first term? last? right in the middle?)
- Do you care for money? (which is not bad in itself: how do you picture your life in ten years? family? children? do they eat? what is your idea of being a good parent?)
- IIRC, Dirac started as an engineer
- on the other hand, very often crackpots are engineers...
 
  • #3
very often crackpots are engineers

Hey! I resemble that remark!
 
  • #4
Originally posted by enigma
Hey! I resemble that remark!

Resemble or resent?
 
  • #5
Resemble... definitely resemble. :wink:
 
  • #6
I use to be a Communication engineer in the Royal Corps of Signals, lately I'm working primarily on the Internet and IMHO Physics is more fun but unless you're VERY good there's not much money in it.
 
  • #7
Well, I was a software engineer for a while until I recently decided to entirely switch careers. But then, I'm single so it was much easier in that respect.

What I have found is pick something that you actually enjoy doing. Think of the environments you will be in and what you will *actually* be doing day-to-day. If you really like what you do, the money will come. Besides, what fun is having money when you spend most of your waking hours doing something you don't like?

The exact details of your situation will probably have a large impact on how you procede. Like was asked, how far along in EE are you? Also, what are your finicial resources? Could you afford to go another year or so if you changed your mind, again?

I firmly believe it's not how long it takes you to finish school, as long as you actually finish. With some skill, you can remain a self sufficient student indefinitely! (trust me, I know :smile: ).
 
  • #8
string_theory said:
I am an electrical engineering student...

but I have a deep interest in physics...
what would you advice me to do?

Just start teaching Physics of the level u can.
 
  • #9
Wow.

ElectroPhysics,

There really isn't a need to resurrect threads that are almost a year old from the dead like this.
 
  • #10
wow, can you say necropost?
 

1) How can I give helpful advice to someone who needs it?

First, listen actively to the person's problem and ask clarifying questions. Then, offer your perspective and possible solutions, but also encourage them to make their own decision.

2) What should I do if I don't have enough knowledge or experience to give advice?

It's okay to acknowledge that you may not have all the answers. You can offer to research the topic or suggest seeking advice from someone with more expertise in the area.

3) How do I know if my advice is actually helpful?

The best way to gauge the effectiveness of your advice is to ask for feedback from the person you gave it to. They can let you know if it was useful and if they followed through with it.

4) What if the person doesn't take my advice?

Remember that ultimately, the decision is up to the person seeking advice. If they choose not to follow your advice, respect their decision and offer your support regardless.

5) Is it okay to give unsolicited advice?

It is generally best to wait for someone to ask for your advice before offering it. However, if you have a close relationship with the person and believe your advice could genuinely help them, it may be appropriate to gently offer it. Just be prepared for the possibility that they may not want to hear it.

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