Something's gotta give - Gasoline Prices

  • News
  • Thread starter mpm
  • Start date
  • #76
Skyhunter
Evo said:
It just makes so much more sense.

When my kids were small, if the school called because they were sick, I could be there in 5 minutes, take them home, get them settled in and within an hour, tops, be working again, with them in bed. Because I worked at home, I could make that hour up during the time I would normally be driving home.

If I worked at an office, I would have to take the rest of the day off. And if they were sick the next day, I'd have to take that day off too. And it would all be lost time.

There is so much that can be done online. I can video conferencing with co-workers. We can do web colaborations where we can all work on projects together, real time, sharing and manipulating documents online as if we were in a room together. Unless I need to physically touch another person, I can do anything remotely that I would do in an office.
In the beginning of the micro computer revolution I worked as a consultant. One of the companies I worked for hired me full time to develop and maintain an in-house information system. When I was pounding code I insisted that I work at home, I had PCAnywhere installed and 9600 baud modems so I could usually handle any problems that might arise while I was not there.

The owner of the company insisted that I work at the office, which was a high stress environment. I refused. When he felt I was no longer indespensible he insisted, so I quit.

He was not happy when he had to pay me consultant fees whenever he had a problem.

I did train someone for him. I was also the one who kept insisting that the company would suffer if anything happened to me, since I was the only person who understood the system.

It all comes down to trust, even though I always delivered the product, and he was always happy with the results, he just couldn't trust me to work at home.

Oops did we just hijack this thread?
 
  • #77
Astronuc
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
18,929
2,246
Iran Offers Oil to U.S. in Katrina Gesture

By ALI AKBAR DAREINI, Associated Press Writer

TEHRAN, Iran - Iran will send the United States 20 million barrels of crude oil to help it overcome the devastation of Hurricane Katrina if Washington waives trade sanctions, a senior Iranian oil official said.

In a gesture that mirrors American aid offers after a devastating 2003 earthquake in Iran, Tehran's envoy to the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries said his government would ship up to 20 million barrels of oil to the United States, state radio reported late Tuesday.

"If U.S. sanctions are lifted, Iran is prepared to send that quantity of oil to America," the radio quoted Hossein Kazempour as saying.

When asked about that report in Washington, State Department spokesman Sean McCormack said, "No, we haven't received any direct contact from the Iranian government with an offer.

There were no signs that the U.S. policy toward Iran was about to change. Last week the Iranian Foreign Ministry offered to send relief supplies to the American Red Cross; Iranian newspapers reported that no response had been received.

Iran's offers reciprocates the goodwill that the United States displayed after an earthquake flattened the southeastern Iranian city of Bam in 2003, killing more than 26,000 people. The United States flew in emergency supplies, which were gratefully unloaded at an Iranian airport.
http://
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #78
SOS2008
Gold Member
24
1
If this is true, it shows that what Iran really wants is better relations with the U.S. -- That is what they keep leveraging for. If they are offering an olive branch first, and what a great opportunity!
 
  • #79
BobG
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
185
81
SOS2008 said:
If this is true, it shows that what Iran really wants is better relations with the U.S. -- That is what they keep leveraging for. If they are offering an olive branch first, and what a great opportunity!
It is true that Iran wants better relations with the US. This particular offer of assistance isn't without strings though. They tied the oil to removal of sanctions.

Iran wants better trade ties with other countries and the sanctions on them hinder that. They also want to come to the table as a power, which is why they aren't very willing to cave on their nuclear program. Which has more priority to them is up in the air.

Politically, if I were them, I would have offered the oil with no strings attached and prayed the US would accept it. Later on, I would have publicly brought up the fact that they came to US aid while arguing to have the sanctions removed.
 
  • #80
SOS2008
Gold Member
24
1
BobG said:
It is true that Iran wants better relations with the US. This particular offer of assistance isn't without strings though. They tied the oil to removal of sanctions.

Iran wants better trade ties with other countries and the sanctions on them hinder that. They also want to come to the table as a power, which is why they aren't very willing to cave on their nuclear program. Which has more priority to them is up in the air.

Politically, if I were them, I would have offered the oil with no strings attached and prayed the US would accept it. Later on, I would have publicly brought up the fact that they came to US aid while arguing to have the sanctions removed.
So what if the sanctions were removed and Iran was allowed to come back to the International table? I think it would help, not hurt the directions of things even before this offer--I believe Iran would become a more moderate state if the U.S. would renew relations. And of course the U.S. could really use the oil, though maybe U.S. oil companies/Bush cronies would prefer excuses to gouge?
 
  • #81
Art
SOS2008 said:
So what if the sanctions were removed and Iran was allowed to come back to the International table? I think it would help, not hurt the directions of things even before this offer--I believe Iran would become a more moderate state if the U.S. would renew relations. And of course the U.S. could really use the oil, though maybe U.S. oil companies/Bush cronies would prefer excuses to gouge?
The sanctions on Iran are US sanctions only not UN. They specifically bar US petroleum companies from importing Iranian oil. This ban would have to be lifted for Iran to ship oil to the U.S. Bush eased sanctions temporarily (for 90 days) in the past to allow non-profit organisations and individuals to send aid to Iran after the Bam earthquake, presumably the Iranians are asking for the same again so they can reciprocate.

Edit: This is more a response to Bob's comments than yours SOS.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #82
Astronuc
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
18,929
2,246
I heard this morning that Natural Gas prices will increase yet again. The Gulf region accounts for 20% of production and only 40% has been restored. Gas prices have been moving up since last year - almost doubling.

http://www.oilnergy.com/1gnymex.htm [Broken]

Home heating oil and gasoline have almost doubled.

The price of fuel has increased such that many governments and school districts will see an increase in transportation cost - as will many workers who drive to work.

The major airlines have been hit hard by fuel costs. Delta is struggling to avoid bankruptcy, but may be forced into by the end of the year - despite selling off its 767's and reducing service in Cincinnati.

It was unwise for the Bush administration and Congress to subsidize SUV's and not push for higher fuel efficiencies.

There is already discussion that gasoline will likely stay above $3.00/gallon in the forseeable future.

If the cost of energy remains high - there is a concern about inflation - meaning higher interest rates are possible. Local, state and federal governments are also faced with higher costs - so local and state governments may have to raise taxes, and the federal government as well or face greater deficits.

Higher interest rates and reduced consumption of consumer goods will produce another recession, and now 'global recession' is being mentioned in many quarters.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #83
Astronuc said:
It was unwise for the Bush administration and Congress to subsidize SUV's and not push for higher fuel efficiencies.
Ford and Toyota recalls are mostly gas guzzling trucks and SUVs. Wouldn't it be nice if they just took these off the market completely? I can't imagine anyone being so stupid as to buy a vehicle now that is not fuel efficient, but stupidity seems to prevail in this country.
Astronuc said:
If the cost of energy remains high - there is a concern about inflation - meaning higher interest rates are possible. ...Higher interest rates and reduced consumption of consumer goods will produce another recession, and now 'global recession' is being mentioned in many quarters.
I just read that because of Katrina the feds may hold off on rate hikes a little longer.
 
  • #84
60
0
2CentsWorth said:
Ford and Toyota recalls are mostly gas guzzling trucks and SUVs. Wouldn't it be nice if they just took these off the market completely? I can't imagine anyone being so stupid as to buy a vehicle now that is not fuel efficient, but stupidity seems to prevail in this country.
I just read that because of Katrina the feds may hold off on rate hikes a little longer.
The recalls were of SUVs, but not because of other issues, a problem with the power steering for the Toyota SUVs.

As for getting SUVs off the street, I think the public is taking care of that themselves. From what I've heard, SUV sales have plummeted. People are trying to sell their used SUVs and are unable to.

Rumors are of Ford and GM declaring bankruptcy. Sounds like they made the same mistakes of the seventies- trying to sell gas-guzzling behemoths when there's high gas prices.
 
  • #85
Skyhunter
2CentsWorth said:
I just read that because of Katrina the feds may hold off on rate hikes a little longer.
Mortgage rates actually fell 1/2 a percent after Katrina hit. I have a friend buying the house she lives in and her rate went from 3.75 to 3.25 right after the hurricane.
 
  • #86
Skyhunter
TRCSF said:
Rumors are of Ford and GM declaring bankruptcy. Sounds like they made the same mistakes of the seventies- trying to sell gas-guzzling behemoths when there's high gas prices.
I suppose another tax payer bailout is in the works. I sure hope our grandchildren are industrious. They are going to have one hell of a debt to pay off!
 
  • #87
BobG
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
185
81
So the solution is to release oil from the US strategic reserve, receive oil from other countries to supplement our normal supply.

How well has it worked? The price of crude is going downward and the price at the pump is still going up. http://slate.msn.com/id/2125900/?nav=tap3 [Broken] where the price difference comes from.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Related Threads on Something's gotta give - Gasoline Prices

  • Last Post
2
Replies
40
Views
4K
Replies
83
Views
6K
Replies
22
Views
7K
Replies
30
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
10
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
8
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
5K
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
660
Replies
7
Views
818
Top