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Sound and heat

  1. Apr 14, 2015 #1
    Likely a stupid question.
    If atoms vibrate with heat, why don't hot objects make a sound, i.e transferring vibrations to the surround atoms (air) into our eardrums?

    They vibrate on ultra-infra sound? Or it's a extremely weak sound? or this is not the same vibration as the cause for sound? or they vibrate chaotically and interfering?

    Googling led me to news about "listening" to atoms vibrations but that doesn't really answer this!

  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 14, 2015 #2


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    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor

    Sound is generated by the collective motion of a large number of molecules moving at the same time in the same way. The collisions of the air molecules with a hot object are too random to create a sound wave.
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