Space Travel n size of traveller

In summary, the conversation discusses the possibility of encountering aliens and what they might look like. The discussion also includes considerations such as the size and intelligence of potential alien species, the practical limits of size and mass, and examples from science fiction. The conversation ends with a recommendation for further reading on the topic.
  • #1
darkar
187
0
What do u think?

There is 3 category.

1. Species which size bigger than us.
2. Species which have the same size as us.
3. Species which is smaller than us.

Assuming all of the kinds have the same intelligence as us, living in different world, wish same Earth like environment. Which one will be able to make space exploration faster? easier? Why?
 
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  • #2
Perhaps i should change the question a bit.

In most science fiction, the alien we encounter are always thought to be almost the same size or body like human.

But if there really exist aliens, and one day we encounter them, use your imagination, what do you think they will look like??
 
  • #3
If they are on a planet such as Earth, gravity will be similar. They will not therefore be much larger than any Earth animal. Intelligent Brains need big energy sources, so slow moving large animals aren't really possible. So, human sized or smaller is my guess - it depends how efficiently nature can build an intelligent brain though.

What will they look like? - impossible to guess.
 
  • #4
if they're smaller they can make smaller ships, and rely on less energy intake, i think? also they will find it easier to leave their atmosphere, so the smaller the alien, the more likely that it will meet us first, but ultimatly, an alien could be just about whatever size that works for it and it's environment...
 
  • #5
If they were big, they would find it more efficient to jump to Earth since they are so strong! Just adding to the bs...
 
  • #6
I rather like the 1 micron long aliens that lived on the surface of a Neutron star in Baxter's SF book "Flux". Although there were a few details I didnt' like, on the overall I thought it was a very interesting idea. Also relevant would be Sturgeon's "The Mircocosmic God".
 
  • #7
i think i heard that there were aliens on the moon, alien bacteria off of a camera or something
 
  • #8
hexhunter said:
an alien could be just about whatever size that works for it and it's environment...
There are practical limits to size and/or mass based upon both physics and physiology. The square/cube law prevents a 'solid' creature from getting too large and still being mobile in a non-supportive environment (ie: a blue whale, even if it had legs, wouldn't do well on land) There comes a point where the structural integrity of the body can't support the mass. Something gaseous, like an intelligent derigible, or sea-dwelling, could get a lot bigger. Likewise, if one sticks to any known neurological basis there is a lower limit to how small a brain can be and still have the capacity for intelligence.

pervect said:
I rather like the 1 micron long aliens that lived on the surface of a Neutron star in Baxter's SF book "Flux".
In that case, definitely check out 'Dragon's Egg' and the sequel 'Starquake' by Robert L. Forward. They're excellent accounts of life on a neutron star.
 

Related to Space Travel n size of traveller

1. What is the maximum size of a traveller that can go to space?

The maximum size of a traveller that can go to space is currently limited by the size of the spacecraft and the technology used to launch it. Most spacecraft have weight and size restrictions due to the amount of fuel needed to escape Earth's gravity.

2. What are the physical requirements for a person to become an astronaut?

Astronauts are required to meet certain physical criteria, including height, weight, and overall health. They must also undergo rigorous training to prepare for the physical demands of space travel, such as the effects of microgravity on the human body.

3. Can people of all ages travel to space?

Currently, there is no age limit for space travel. However, due to the physical demands and risks involved, most astronauts are between the ages of 26 and 46. There have been a few exceptions, such as John Glenn who traveled to space at the age of 77.

4. How long does it take to travel to space?

The time it takes to travel to space varies depending on the destination and the spacecraft used. It typically takes around 8 minutes to reach orbit, but traveling to the Moon can take 3 days, and a trip to Mars can take anywhere from 6-9 months.

5. Is there a weight limit for objects or equipment that can be brought on a space mission?

Yes, there are weight limits for objects and equipment that can be brought on a space mission. Every spacecraft has a weight limit and the amount of weight that can be brought is carefully calculated to ensure a successful launch and safe journey. However, some larger spacecraft, like the International Space Station, have the ability to transport heavier objects and equipment.

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