Spaghetti Beam Breaking?

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In summary, the speaker is asking why it is harder to break three spaghetti that are tied together compared to when they are separated by a certain distance. The conversation discusses the setup and measurement of "harder to break," mentioning vector diagrams and reading about moment of inertia and torque. Ultimately, it is explained that when the spaghetti are tied together, the force is distributed over a larger area, requiring a larger force to break them. This leads to the conclusion that spaghetti breaks due to pressure, not force.
  • #1
Hi fellow members,
I have one question for you that may seem basic and easy that is however concerning me: why when 3 spaghetti are tied together it is harder to break them than when they are separated by a certain distance?

Thank you in advance!

NB :Number of spaghetti and reparation don't really matter, just for the sake of quantifying.
 
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  • #2
Umberto Tabalappi said:
I have one question for you that may seem basic and easy that is however concerning me: why when 3 spaghetti are tied together it is harder to break them than when they are separated by a certain distance?
One would have to know the exact setup and how "harder to break" was measured. When separated, do they break one-by-one, while breaking together when combined?
 
  • #3
A.T. said:
One would have to know the exact setup and how "harder to break" was measured. When separated, do they break one-by-one, while breaking together when combined?
Alright, sorry for being unclear. The image is the set up for the spaghetti when they are separated and they break by applying a small mass. When the spaghetti are instead close together (no separatio) the mass needed to break them is bigger. Why is that?
 

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  • #4
Umberto Tabalappi said:
Alright, sorry for being unclear. The image is the set up for the spaghetti when they are separated and they break by applying a small mass. When the spaghetti are instead close together (no separatio) the mass needed to break them is bigger. Why is that?
Draw a vector diagram for both cases, with the horizontal and vertical components of the force by the string on the outer beams. It's simpler with just two beams.
 
  • #5
Sorry buy Ì don't understand how it can be helpful. I just want to know why when the three spaghetti are together you need more force to break them than when they are separated. Is it because they have less shear stress or something to this extent?
 
  • #6
Umberto Tabalappi said:
Sorry buy Ì don't understand how it can be helpful.
Which is why you should do it.
 
  • #9
Try reading on the concept of moment of inertia...it has something in common with torque.
 
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  • #10
A.T. said:
I Think I have figured out a rough explanation. So, in the case of the separated spaghetti, even if we attach a lower mass an angle between the anchor point and the load is created. The angle is >0° and therefore more load is distributed on each anchor point. When the spaghetti are tied together the angle is =0° and therefore, up until a certain extent, even if we attach a heavier load, the distribution on the anchor point would be less than if the spaghetti were separated.
Is it somehow right?
 
  • #11
  • #12
Yes, Now it's all' much clearer. Thank you so much!
 
  • #13
Umberto Tabalappi said:
Hi fellow members,
I have one question for you that may seem basic and easy that is however concerning me: why when 3 spaghetti are tied together it is harder to break them than when they are separated by a certain distance?

Thank you in advance!

NB :Number of spaghetti and reparation don't really matter, just for the sake of quantifying.
Note: Spaghetti breaks due to large pressure not force.
When you tie together 3 spaghetti the force is distributed along a larger area compared to a single spaghetti, hence you need larger force to apply the pressure required to break the spaghetti. Therefore its harder to break it.
 

1. What is a spaghetti beam?

A spaghetti beam is a term used in physics to describe a beam of particles, such as protons or electrons, that are tightly packed together and move in a straight line. It is named after the popular Italian pasta, spaghetti, due to its resemblance in shape.

2. How does a spaghetti beam break?

A spaghetti beam can break due to various reasons, such as collisions with other particles or interaction with external forces. The breaking of a spaghetti beam can also be intentional, as scientists use specialized devices to manipulate and control the beam for their experiments.

3. What are the potential dangers of spaghetti beam breaking?

The main danger of spaghetti beam breaking is the release of high levels of radiation. The particles in the beam can also cause damage to equipment and materials in its path. However, scientists take extensive precautions and safety measures to minimize these risks.

4. How do scientists study spaghetti beam breaking?

Scientists use various methods and equipment to study spaghetti beam breaking, such as particle accelerators, detectors, and computer simulations. These tools allow them to observe and analyze the behavior and properties of the particles in the beam before, during, and after the breaking process.

5. What practical applications does spaghetti beam breaking have?

The study of spaghetti beam breaking has various practical applications in fields such as nuclear physics, material sciences, and medical research. It allows scientists to understand the fundamental properties of matter and develop new technologies, such as particle therapy for cancer treatment.

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