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Spam trends

  1. Jan 20, 2006 #1
    Do you guys get spam that has subjects that just make no sense. I get about 10 of these a day. The subject says stuff like: "caps here, and to make bows th...", "be Kristina tread ", "some sole a proximate".
    What is the deal with these? I guess that the goal is to get people confused about what the email is about, in the hopes that the people will be curious and open the email exposing them to the advertisement within.
    I guess subjects like that get past anti-spam software better too.
    This is a pretty smart strategy for spammers I guess. Do you guys get these?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 20, 2006 #2

    DaveC426913

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    More B than A: the intent is to slip past automated spam filters.

    I have seen them change just recently. Now I'm getting all sorts of stock market tips.
     
  4. Jan 20, 2006 #3

    Doc Al

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    It's semi-smart. It gets past the automated filters, but it also makes it very easy for a human to spot spam. (I get plenty.)
     
  5. Jan 20, 2006 #4

    Moonbear

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    I don't get much spam, though the newsletters from my professional societies all come in with a tag on them saying "possible spam." :rofl: I need to find out what our IT department is up to and inform them they are tagging things that aren't spam, just in case they were planning to implement something to actually filter it out.
     
  6. Jan 20, 2006 #5
    i've been getting lots of those spams that are like


    "Dr. Ms Abigale,

    I regret to inform you that your dear uncle, king of Backelstonia has just died recently. You have been named the sole heir. please send all bank account information to us at Beans and Co Law Offices and we will send his millions directly to your account."

    or they say

    "Dear Ms Abigale,

    it has been brought to our attention that you a very wise individual and would be interesting in making a large sum of money. recently a Mr Big of Gymbia has died and left a large estate to his heirs. unfortunately, these heirs have thus far been unlocatable. our company is willing to offer you a large percentage of this estate if you're willing to cooperate with us. we would like to claim you as the sole heir to his estate, and taking only a small portion out for out company, will hand over that estate to you. please enclose account information if interested"

    the first time i got one, i thought it was cute cause it seemed so formal and the english was bad. but the english has gotten better, and i get too many for them to be cute. some don't even ask for my info, so i don't get where the scam is. i even replied back once, and they replied again asking to set up a business appt and letting me know they'd get me at the airport and blah.
     
  7. Jan 20, 2006 #6
    You should email them back and act very interested. And tell them that they need to fly into your town so you can sign the deal and give them the info. Say you are bed ridden or something like that. Tell them you will pick them up at the airport. Then get ahold of your local news team, and have them expose them at the airport. That would be great.
     
  8. Jan 20, 2006 #7

    enigma

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    Yeah, except they will have twenty things go wrong with them getting on the plane which would require you to send them money first.
     
  9. Jan 20, 2006 #8

    turbo

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    Here is a sweet one! A couple of years back, I put my Harley up for sale on a morotcycle ad website. I got a very excited email from a nice, polite guy who said that my Road King was exactly what he had been looking for, down to the accessories and the color scheme. He said he was working abroad for the next couple of months, but wanted the bike waiting for him when he got back to the states. I gave him my address and he Fed-Exed me a cashier's check for the full amount plus $5100 with a request that I send the excess to his agent, who would make arrangements to come pick up the bike, etc. He specified that I should use Western Union, so the guy could have the money that same day. Instead, I called Integrated Payment Systems and asked for their security and fraud department. I described the check to the fraud guy in detail, including all the security features that I could see, and gave him the check #. He said "we never issued that check." Apparently, someone in Nigeria has a really lucrative business going in fake cashier's checks and they buy really expensive items with no intention of ever getting them - they just want the overpayment sent through Western Union in such a manner that they can pick it up anonymously at about any WU location. It must work a fraction of the time...
     
  10. Jan 20, 2006 #9
    that's a good one
     
  11. Jan 20, 2006 #10
    "Pia- Just do her"

    ....

    a little straight forward?
     
  12. Jan 21, 2006 #11

    Doc Al

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    For example, here are selected subject lines from this morning's spam pile (all from unrecognized senders):
    Re: magnesium
    a godson, Mirabelle it's unit
    arthur, the sandman
    it's antigone, Bernarr in small
    ivanhoe, on wetland
    Re: Have spell the playback british
    see inhuman, Flint a wrongdo
    or wah, Daniel or precocity
    it Andi, some seagram
    it's Harrie, some daphne​
    Now why in the world would I ever open one of these? :rolleyes:
     
  13. Jan 21, 2006 #12

    Pengwuino

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    I get hte same crap. It definitely gets by Thunderbird and Comcast's spam filters.

    Yah I don't think they are THAT stupid :tongue2:

    There are "419 scams".

    http://www.secretservice.gov/alert419.shtml

    Theres something about the Nigerian law that allows this kind of crap to run wild. I ran across a forum full of anti-419'ers! They basically pretend to be suckered into these schemes and absolutely screw over the people doing the scheme. It turns out a lot of these scam-perpetrators will do ANYTHING (i've seen threads full of the funniest REAL pictures of these guys like writing on their head or doing insanely stupid stuff just so they can keep the scam going). These anti-419'ers are even more creative in keeping the scam going while humiliating the scammer and not paying a dime as the scammers are in making up BS.

    One guy had the mother of all pranks. It involved buying goods with fake money pretty much. Scammer wanted to order some laptops for way above retail price but he had to have them immediately and offered to send fedex over to pick up the stuff and would send a, of course, fake check. Another aspect was something like... he said they would be sent to the same country for some "agent" to pick up. What actually happened, of course, is that the "agent" was just a re-routing person who then sent the "laptops" to nigeria. Well, needless to say, it was hilarious. The guy verifies the check is fake, fedex comes around and he sends him a huuuuuuuge box full of "laptops". Well, the "laptops" were a collection of junk the guy had around his computer store (trash basically). The guy in Nigeria gets it and he goes nuts. He says he's going to send hitmen to kill him and that the hitmen are outside his shop right now and that he knows the president and will have the president personally kill him. The scamee repeatedly says "no please dont kill me!!!" as a joke and says he will send the real laptops next time. Well, fedex comes back (oh and hte nigerian is paying alllllllll shipping charges) and what shall he load the package with this time? That's right, a washing machine! (not working of course). Well he sends that off and theres this continual back and forth ... hilarious emails... guy must have spent thousands of dollars shipping crap... while the computer store owner laughed his butt off :)

    Another guy was actually able to get money from the scammer! I forget how... but he donated the money to charity, freaken hilarious.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2006
  14. Jan 21, 2006 #13

    Moonbear

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    Are these sent out by actual spammers, or is there some email virus/worm thing that's generating random titles, so some unwittingly infected person's computer is just sending stuff out like that? (Then again, I guess you wouldn't want to open it to find out.) This sounds like some silly random-sentence program one of my friends had when we were in high school. It would just choose words at (somewhat) random from a database, and make sentences out of them. Some were hilarious, and some made absolutely no sense at all.
     
  15. Jan 21, 2006 #14
    Sounds like a program that randomly puts words together. It seems like if a person were to put the words together they would at least put them together in such a way that they make sense.
     
  16. Jan 21, 2006 #15

    ShawnD

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    I get emails like that, but the entire email is nonsensical. The title means nothing. The body means nothing. No products are listed. The email has no links. The return address is fake (look at what smtp server sent it).
    I don't understand what the point of sending these is.
     
  17. Jan 22, 2006 #16
    Ya, I get emails sometimes that are just blank. The title is blank, and the entire email is blank. I have recieved a few that were written in a white colored font, so I had to highlight the email to invert the colors to read them, and they made sense but they were like crazy stories. They made sense in the sense that the sentences where written with correct syntax and stuff like that. But they didn't make sense because the stuff written looked like it was written by someone on some acid. It was just crazy rambling. I think I might have gotten three or four of these when I had AOL.
     
  18. Jan 22, 2006 #17

    Mk

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    You guys read your spam?? Hasn't anybody ever told you, that you catch viruses, trojan horses, and worms by opening it?

    BTW I don't get any spam, and never have. Do you guys just give out your email address to anyone?? Also, I have 4 levels of email addresses, depending on what it is :biggrin:

    Lowest is 4th, its xxxxxxx@mailinator.com, for subscriptions that I'll never use. Why do I sign up? http://mailinator.com
    3rd is hotmailalternateaddress@hotmail.com, for subscriptions, junk mail, stuff you don't want
    2nd is Mks@physicsforums.com, stuff I might want to read, subscriptions, junk mail
    1st is... well I can't tell you, its only for email I care about, and I don't get but two or three a day, and all those PF thread subscriptions.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2006
  19. Jan 22, 2006 #18

    Pengwuino

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    You don't get viruses simply by opening the mails. You normally have to run an attachment.
     
  20. Jan 22, 2006 #19
    I believe you can get viruses by just opening them if the email is in HTML and has graphics that are actually remotely hosted scripts. I don't know the details though.
     
  21. Jan 22, 2006 #20

    Mk

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    And the attachments can automatically run, without your consent or knowledge.
     
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