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Speed of light in all frames of reference

  1. Jun 23, 2016 #1
    It's said that, speed of light is same in every frame is reference. Consider an ideal situation, if I'm also moving at the speed of light, will I feel light to be at rest or still at the speed of light itself according to my frame of reference?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 23, 2016 #2

    mfb

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    You cannot without violating relativity. Asking what relativity predicts if relativity cannot be applied is pointless.
     
  4. Jun 23, 2016 #3
    Sorry, I did not get you.
     
  5. Jun 23, 2016 #4

    mfb

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    The question you asked just does not make sense.

    "If I do not exist, where do I live?"
     
  6. Jun 23, 2016 #5

    Doc Al

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    The problem is that relativity prohibits you from moving at the speed of light with respect to anything. That's why your question is meaningless as stated.

    But we can change your question a bit so that it's answerable: What if you were moving at 0.99c with respect to me? If either you or I shine a beam of light, we would both measure that light to be moving at the usual speed c with respect to ourselves.

    Does that help?
     
  7. Jun 23, 2016 #6

    Nugatory

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    What he said.

    You might also try googling for "relativistic velocity addition", and search this forum for threads that mention that phrase.
    If, having done that, you find yourself thinking "That is absurd. Why would anyone believe that? What proof is there?" check out the sticky thread at the top of this forum on experimental proof of relativity.
     
  8. Jun 23, 2016 #7
    Thank you for clearing my doubt. I got you. Means even if we are moving with whatever possible speed less than speed of light, with respect to the frame, we still see the speed of light to be 3X10^8 m/s only right?
     
  9. Jun 23, 2016 #8
     
  10. Jun 23, 2016 #9
    Sorry I've reposted the corrected question again in comments please check it out. Thanks for correcting me
     
  11. Jun 23, 2016 #10

    jtbell

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    Right.
     
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