Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Speed of light

  1. Feb 28, 2004 #1
    if you travel in the speed of light
    it is so fast that your time would freeze.

    say if you travel around earth for 12 hours on speed of light
    that means you are frozen for 12 hours but what about the other time.
    those people who are not travelling in the speed of light wouldnt have their time frozen. so would you be in past or present ?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 28, 2004 #2

    chroot

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    A) You cannot travel the speed of light.

    B) Travelling very quickly with respect to the earth would facilitate "time travel" to the future. You would age very little during your trip, while everyone on earth would age normally.

    - Warren
     
  4. Feb 29, 2004 #3
    I do not understand. How can you age less than them? It does not make sense for me for time to not be absolute.
     
  5. Feb 29, 2004 #4

    chroot

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    It doesn't make sense for me for time to BE absolute.

    - Warren
     
  6. Feb 29, 2004 #5
    Decker, if you don't understand the flexibility of space-time, you might consider looking into a book on relativity. It's pretty well established that time is not absolute.

    cookiemonster
     
  7. Feb 29, 2004 #6
    Okay, I'll see if I can afford a book. Thanks for sharing, chroot.
     
  8. Feb 29, 2004 #7
    Speed of light huh...
    it would be nice to have one :D
    i mean a space ship which can travel speed of light
    i wouldnt want to melt you know :/
    unless you are on space
     
  9. Feb 29, 2004 #8
    So where would you go with one, AnthreX?

    cookiemonster
     
  10. Feb 29, 2004 #9

    chroot

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    As I said, it's not possible to build a spaceship that can go the speed of light.

    - Warren
     
  11. Feb 29, 2004 #10
    I think they are jsut brainstorming.
     
  12. Feb 29, 2004 #11
    It's still an important distinction.

    cookiemonster
     
  13. Feb 29, 2004 #12

    chroot

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    This is not the appropriate forum for brainstorming. Try the Theory Development forum.

    - Warren
     
  14. Feb 29, 2004 #13
    90% of science is thinking stuff up, 10% testing to see if you're correct. (those numbers where plucked out of thin air)

    the faster you go, the slower Time goes for you.
    the more gravity you are being effected by, Time goes slower for you.

    so if you are traveling at near light speed while under high G's, for 1 year, you would age 1 year, where as everyone else who is NOT going near light speed under high G's, (such as everyone back on earth) aged faster, like 100 years. again, the numbers are plucked at random, but the prinsable is well known.

    acually, is there some calculation that determins the Time differnce as you go faster, and as the G's go up, and also if Time goes faster WHILE G's go up.

    i often hear about people going into space and even if they traveled at the speed of light it would take them 1000's of years to get anywhere decent and it would be their great great great great great grandkids that would acually get where they are going. which i feel is very wrong, once you are going the speed of light, any trip is instentanyous. (for you that is) (grabs a knife and butchers that long word)
     
  15. Feb 29, 2004 #14
    Instantaneous. I may suck at physics, but I can spell good.

    This time thing - I know it's correct, so I am not denying it or anything. But to be honest, it just seems very weird. It's kind of a strange feeling trying to accept something that I've never experienced and can't imagine.

    I think probably a lot of people experienced that when they learned about time not being absolute.
     
  16. Feb 29, 2004 #15

    HallsofIvy

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor


    I'm glad you admitted "plucking them out of thin air". I would suspect they should be the other way around.


    Yes, and the formulas are pretty well known too. Why not use actual numbers? By the way, it is the speed being close to light speed that slows things down. Acceleration is not important (well, until you get to REALLY high "G's" like you would feel on the surface of the sun- and if I remember correctly, high forces or high "G's" make time speed up).

    No, it is not acceleration that is important, it is speed.

    Where do you hear about these people? I don't believe anyone has ever actually done anything like that! If you are thinking about stories about people traveling in "generation ships" to distant stars, the whole point was that they could not get to speeds anywhere near the speed of light.
     
    Last edited: Feb 29, 2004
  17. Feb 29, 2004 #16
    That is exactly what Einstein solved in his theory of relativity, is that time isn't absolute. It is always different to respect to n-variable motions of all particles. It may be a fraction of a millionth of a second, but there is still time dialation in respect to all particles.
     
    Last edited: Feb 29, 2004
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Speed of light
  1. Speed of light (Replies: 8)

Loading...