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Speed of light

  1. Oct 3, 2007 #1
    i am new to this forum and i apologize if i am misusing it by posting this question. i am not in any way knowledgable about physics. im not even a student any longer. i barley graduated high school. but i truly believe i have proof thta the speed of light has been and is being surpassed by solid matter.

    i am aware, personal theories or overly speculative posts are not allowed in the main forums. so i wont go into details. my question is: if i am correct or even close enough to make others go hmmmm. how would i go about getting published and making sure i get credit for the theory? i also know the theory would have to be in mathmatical form. i dont even no where to begin to write something like that. any help here would be greatly appreciated
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 3, 2007 #2

    cristo

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    No offence, but I'd say you're wrong. Special relativity is a concrete theory, and has been around for over 100 years now, and has stood up to many, many tests and speculation. Still, though, if you think your theory is correct then you can always post it in the independent research forum.
     
  4. Oct 3, 2007 #3

    russ_watters

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    You don't have the knowledge of the subject that you need to draw the conclusion you are drawing. Also, without full knowledge of the subject matter (and some writing skill), you won't be capable of presenting your conclusion in a way that would make a credible argument, so it won't be possible to get published.

    I'd recommend you start reading up on the subject. Maybe even take some physics courses at a local college. You'll likely be able to figure out your error.

    We don't stifle learning here, so if you actually want to learn, we can help you. But that means dropping your belief that you've found something and instead asking about (and making an honest effort to learn) how you've misunderstand the scenario you are thinking about. And please don't take this the wrong way, but with your knowledge level about the subject, your misunderstanding is probably very basic.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2007
  5. Oct 3, 2007 #4

    Ivan Seeking

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    Rather than a theory, could you post a question that could rule out your idea, based on the answer?
     
  6. Oct 3, 2007 #5
    Did you happen to measure the length of the object (in direction of motion) that was moving faster then the speed of light? I need to know what its measured length was so I can sleep at night.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2007
  7. Oct 4, 2007 #6
    you most likely misunderstood something. what leads you to think there are objects going faster than the speed of light?

    if I were you I would just start with the assumption that you misunderstood something and need help understanding it, and not that you've single handedly proved SR wrong. but other than that I don't see how it would break any PF rules to ask... would it?
     
  8. Oct 4, 2007 #7
    i dont think i misunderstood anything. like i said. im not a physicist or even a student. my knowledge of physics is mostly what ive learned form watching the learning channel and discovery. i have read a little online about einstein and his work. but i truly believe ive stumbled on something. and in response to a couple of emails i got. i dont mean to insult anyones inteligence and apologize if i have. as far as measurements, im afraid i'd give it away if i included them
     
  9. Oct 4, 2007 #8
    You would almost certainly give it away if you included them. Include them.
     
  10. Oct 4, 2007 #9

    arildno

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    Dearly Missed

    The playwright Henrik Ibsen once remarked "Premises most wrong produce results most original".


    Don't fancy yourself having any chance whatsoever of contributing anything of worth to a vast subject you don't know a thing about.
    LEARN and UNDERSTAND the subject first, that is the basis for fruition of good ideas for improving it!
     
  11. Oct 4, 2007 #10

    Chi Meson

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    Relativity is not easy. You in fact are insulting the intelligence of many people here who have put a lot of time into trying to understand it. You have stumbled upon something you do not understand. You are one of many hundreds of people who have likewise convinced themselves that they alone have figured out what so many physicists have missed over the last century.

    And all from watching the Learning Channel, no less. Who needs a book?

    But to your original question: how do you go about publishing your "Great Idea" while making sure you get credit for it?


    Get a degree in physics so you can speak in the language of physics, do some research into your "Great Idea," set up an experiment, get results and publish them. If you are right, you are nearly guaranteed a Nobel Prize.

    So get on with it! Why are you still reading posts in a forum. You have got work to do!

    Alternative: tell us what you think the flaw is (post it in the Relativity forum) and a dozen or so people who have studied the subject will be able to help you understand the subject better. If you have happened on something fantastic, we'll be the first to tell you and you can always have the archive of this thread to show people that it was you(!) who first enlightened all the so-called physicists of the world. Hey, PF will become famous too, so we're all for a new breakthrough!

    So, what is it?
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2007
  12. Oct 4, 2007 #11
    ok. now I'm REALLY curious! anyone else? :biggrin:

    no offense if we're being a tad cynical here, but you're not helping.

    why won't you post your idea though? it's not against the guidelines if you post it (most probably to get debunked) in the relativity forum... are you afraid it'll get stolen or something? because that wouldn't happen.

    if your idea turns out to be true, it wouldn't get stolen— you'd have this forum as proof that it was you who discovered it. and every physicist, engineer, teacher, and mathematician in the world would want to meet you. then you'd be named the greatest scientist of the century and win various awards and grants and TV appearances.

    if it turns out to be wrong... well, nobody is interested in claiming ownership for a bad idea... you'll probably feel like a bit of a fool. but it's the internet; nobody here knows who you are.

    we've all asked stupid questions here, nothing to be ashamed of (at least that's what I have to keep telling myself :rofl: :tongue: )... of course, not under the premise of claiming to have discovered the next revolutionary theory of physics after watching a few myth-busters episodes... but hey.
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2007
  13. Oct 5, 2007 #12

    russ_watters

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    Quick question, thumper: have you actually discussed your idea with anyone who knows the applicable physics?
     
  14. Oct 5, 2007 #13
    references frames?---black holes?---



    --hey, we could all chip in and offer him, say, a million for his idea (sight unseen, of course)
     
  15. Oct 5, 2007 #14
    someone just ban him
     
  16. Oct 5, 2007 #15

    Chi Meson

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    No no no. Neither Thumper nor PF mentors are that bad. I am actually very curious as to what he thinks he's got here. It's probably one of the dozens of common "gotcha's" that relativity newcomers come up with. But maybe it's something at least interesting. I kind of doubt it, though.
     
  17. Oct 6, 2007 #16
    i already feel like a fool for wasitng everybodys time. one other person already suggested banning me. i didnt want to insult anyone and i promise this will be my last post, i will maintain my belief. just because a noone stumbles on something doesnt mean it doesnt exist. or that hes wrong. my ignorance of physics doesnt mean im not an intelligent person. i may be wrong. i probably am. but i think its worth looking at. i have spoke to a few people who understand physics. and they told me check some forums on the internet. so this is where i started. believe me. physics has always interested me. but unfortunatley i cant afford to go back to school or i would. as far as banning is concerned. you wont have to. i wont post any more.
     
  18. Oct 6, 2007 #17

    russ_watters

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    Well, goodbye, but that is disappointing. We really don't mind an insolent student - most of us here are teachers at heart and take a tremendous amount of pleasure from being able to help people in that way. It is very disappointing that we were not able to even get you to examine your own [lack of] knowledge. And it makes me wonder why you even came here.
    No one has suggested that you are not and intelligent person.
    Well, they gave you good advice. But you haven't really followed it, have you? You haven't checked anything!
     
  19. Oct 6, 2007 #18

    Art

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    I thought personal theories were a no-no here :confused:

    I think Thumper is using reverse psychology. He or she probably knows if you use this forum to post an oddball theory you get instantly banned (remember the guy with the solid surface of the sun theory as an example).

    By saying he has a theory but won't give any information on it he or she actually has people who normally ban folk for posting such things asking for more details.

    Clever move :rofl:

    p.s. I hope the guy with the sun tectonics theory learns from this :wink: and I'm sure they could both get published here http://www.null-hypothesis.co.uk/
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2007
  20. Oct 7, 2007 #19

    Chi Meson

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    Bye.
    Don't let the door hit you on the way out.
     
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