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Speedy bug

  1. Nov 30, 2008 #1

    wolram

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    I have this bug/s living in my food cupboard, what it is living off is a mystery as all the food in there is in tins, bottles or packets, apart from that the blasted thing/s are so fast i can not swot it/them, and it/they disappear if i empty the cupboard.
    This thing/s is about 3/16 inch long and quite thin, any ideas?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 30, 2008 #2
    My extensive movie knowledge tells me that when a loved one comes up to you and opens their mouth, a swarm of them will come out. So make sure nobody opens their mouth around you until you get this under control.
     
  4. Nov 30, 2008 #3
    Great work. Now this thread needs a parental advisory sign for people exchanging bodily fluids with each others.
     
  5. Nov 30, 2008 #4

    wolram

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    Have threads been mixed up :confused:. movies, bodily fluids, or is it i did not explain that this is a non imaginary insect type thing.
     
  6. Nov 30, 2008 #5

    Pythagorean

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    could it be a flour beetle?

    I've heard flour beetle eggs often get sold with pack of flour and are completely safe for consumption but if the flour gets exposed to the right amount of moisture and heat, they will hatch!
     
  7. Nov 30, 2008 #6
    Could you provide more data on this insect? Is it sensitive to light, what colour of is it, does it have tentacles etc? I think it would be best if you posted a picture of the beast. It is then easier to make the risk assessment.
     
  8. Nov 30, 2008 #7

    wolram

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    Well i only see it for a split second, and i have seen flour Beatles or bugs in flour, they are much smaller than the thing/s in the cupboard, this thing is rod like, i do get the impression of appendages (feelers), but to say it has them is a stretch.
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2008
  9. Nov 30, 2008 #8

    lisab

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    Hmmm...not much to go on. My first thought is a silverfish. They're small and really fast.
     
  10. Nov 30, 2008 #9
    Saw this on Animal Planet. When you take everything into context, the Tiger beetle is the fastest animal in the world. It moves so fast that its brain can't process what it sees fast enough because it is moving so fast. It moves in zig zagging patterns because it doesn't know where it is. It has to stop every once in a while to stop and see where it is.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiger_beetle
     
  11. Nov 30, 2008 #10

    Vanadium 50

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    They seem a tad small to be silverfish, but maybe. They are a very ancient order of insect.
     
  12. Nov 30, 2008 #11

    wolram

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    I looked at silverfish, they fit but seem large up to 1/2 inch, maybe they are baby one's?
     
  13. Nov 30, 2008 #12

    wolram

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    This is an old house.
     
  14. Nov 30, 2008 #13

    Vanadium 50

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    One of those Devonian houses? I try not to stay in anything built before the Permian.
     
  15. Nov 30, 2008 #14

    wolram

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    I live in Warwickshire not Devon.
     
  16. Nov 30, 2008 #15

    Hurkyl

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    Not true; I can outrun one. :tongue:

    Greatest top-speed to 'body length' ratio is not the same thing as fastest.
     
  17. Nov 30, 2008 #16
    Semantics. If the tiger beetle were human sized, it would be able to run at over 300 mph.
     
  18. Nov 30, 2008 #17

    Office_Shredder

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    If it were the size of a human, it would probably die trying to run 300 mph. Now that we have that out of the way...
     
  19. Nov 30, 2008 #18

    Hurkyl

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    Worse, it would probably be crushed under its own weight while standing still!
     
  20. Nov 30, 2008 #19

    Moonbear

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    They can be quite a bit smaller too, so if the shape and speed fits, that's probably what you have. I hate those things. It's the speediness that makes them seem so creepy to me. If they just sat still, they're not so bad looking, but when they dash off, you have to smash them quickly, and then there's that bit gray stain on the wall. :yuck:
     
  21. Nov 30, 2008 #20

    Pythagorean

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    so I guess this kind of answers a mechanical engineering question I had. If you scale something up, the mass increases, increases gravity's force on it, but I've always imagined that as you make things bigger, the atoms have to stay the same size, so you're bound to change the structural integrity of it. By your comments here, I'm assuming that it makes the structure weaker. Is this always the case or does it depend on the types of bonds and materials involved?
     
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