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Spherical conductor

  1. Oct 10, 2009 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Let's say I have :
    Spherical conductor of radius=x;
    Spherical conductor has a inner cubic cavity of side = b;
    inside the cubic cavity we have a charge = y;
    the surface of the sphere has a charge density = z;
    I need to calculate the electric field at some point g, where g>r;


    2. Relevant equations

    I believe we can say that the sphere is uniformly charged.

    3. The attempt at a solution

    I don't need all of these information right?

    All I do is

    E= y/4*pi*E0*g2

    ?????
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data



    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 10, 2009 #2

    G01

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    HINT: This is a Gauss's Law problem. How much charge is enclosed by your Gaussian surface?
     
  4. Oct 10, 2009 #3
    the charge enclose to the surface is just Q.
     
  5. Oct 10, 2009 #4

    G01

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    What do you mean by Q? Express the charge enclosed using the variables and quantities defined by the problem.
     
  6. Oct 10, 2009 #5
    sorry i mean y.

    so all i have to do for the outside electric field is:


    y/4*pi*eog2
     
  7. Oct 11, 2009 #6
    That's all i have to do right?
     
  8. Oct 11, 2009 #7

    G01

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    What about the charge density on the surface of the sphere? You need to take that into account.
     
  9. Oct 12, 2009 #8
    i think this may work:



    Electric field at point g=


    (1/4*pi*eo)*∫ p d(tao)

    = (1/4*pi*eo)*∫chargedensity(z) *radius(x)^2 * sin(theta) d(x) d(theta) d (phi)

    will that work?
     
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