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Spin-statistics theorem

  1. Mar 12, 2006 #1
    could anyone post a link to Pauli's original proof of spin-statistics theorem.have been looking for a long time.could'nt find any.
    thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 12, 2006 #2
  4. Mar 13, 2006 #3

    dextercioby

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    I'm sure there has to be a free copy of it, somewhere...

    Daniel.
     
  5. Mar 13, 2006 #4

    CarlB

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    Drop by your local physics library and download it for free onto your USB hard drive (sometimes called memory stick). Failing that, you can always photocopy it out of the stacks.

    Carl
     
  6. Mar 14, 2006 #5
    i have a sick library around.wish i could get it on the net.even a modified version will be good for a start,heard its pretty deep.
     
  7. Mar 14, 2006 #6

    dextercioby

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    I got a .PDF file of ~622KB with a scanned version. Too bad i can't attach it on this forums...

    Daniel.
     
  8. Mar 15, 2006 #7
    could u mail it to me.it would be great.
     
  9. Mar 31, 2008 #8
    If you email it to me I will host it.
     
  10. Apr 1, 2008 #9
    Guys; aren’t there copyright issues on things like that?

    Don’t the mentors here have to remove posts and known links to stolen material that violates copyright ownership.

    It is one thing to get a library copy for private use, but sharing between members here and providing free access to everyone across the entire internet is not a valid version of private use.
     
  11. Apr 1, 2008 #10

    CarlB

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  12. Apr 1, 2008 #11

    Hans de Vries

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    The Connection Between Spin and Statistics
    W. Pauli Princeton, New Jersey (Received August 19, 1940)

    Amazingly, I now see that Pauli comes up here with the Feynman propagator
    for the KG equation (18) in position space, in 1940(!) after first presenting the
    causal Klein Gordon propagator (15).

    He then goes on to dismiss it with the words:

    "Theories which would make use of the D1 function in their quantization
    would be very much different from the known theories in their consequences."


    This because of the propagation outside the light cone....



    Regards, Hans

    PS:

    D = Klein Gordon Causal propagator in 4d position space
    F = Klein Gordon Causal propagator in 2d position space
    D1 = Feynman KG propagator in 4d position space
    F1 = Feynman KG propagator in 2d position space

    PPS: The domains (x0>r) etcetera are mixed up in (18)
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2008
  13. Apr 1, 2008 #12

    Hans de Vries

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    Just for reference, see also this thread:
    https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=217846


    1+1 dimensional Feynman KG propagator in position space:

    [tex]D^2_F(x,y) = \lim_{\epsilon \to 0} \frac{1}{(2 \pi)^2} \int d^2p \, \frac{e^{-ip(x-y)}}{p^2 - m^2 + i\epsilon}
    = \left \{ \begin{matrix}
    \ \ \ \frac{1}{4} H_0^{(1)}(ms) & \textrm{ if }\, s^2 \geq 0 \\
    -\frac{i }{ 2 \pi} K_0(ms) & \textrm{if }\, s^2 < 0
    \end{matrix} \right. \qquad \qquad s^2\ =\ |x^0 - y^0|^2 - |\vec{x} - \vec{y}|^2
    [/tex]


    3+1 dimensional Feynman KG propagator in position space:

    [tex]D^4_F(x,y) = \lim_{\epsilon \to 0} \frac{1}{(2 \pi)^4} \int d^4p \, \frac{e^{-ip(x-y)}}{p^2 - m^2 + i\epsilon}
    = \left \{ \begin{matrix}
    -\frac{1}{4 \pi} \delta(s^2) + \frac{m}{8 \pi s} H_1^{(1)}(ms) & \textrm{ if }\, s^2 \geq 0 \\
    -\frac{i m}{ 4 \pi^2 s} K_1(ms) & \textrm{if }\, s^2 < 0
    \end{matrix} \right.
    [/tex]


    And the relation between the two is:

    [tex]D^4_F(s)\ =\ \frac{1}{\pi}\ \frac{\partial}{\partial (s^2)}\ D^2_F(s)
    \qquad \left(= \frac{1}{2\pi s}\ \frac{\partial}{\partial s}\ D^2_F(s)\ \right) [/tex]

    Regards, Hans
     
  14. Apr 2, 2008 #13

    Hans de Vries

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