Splinters stuck in skin

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If you have fillings (such as from iron dusts or carbon fiber) stuck in your skin? would it eventually join with your blood flow? What is the filter system of the blood where it couldn't accept the smallest particle and how big is the particle? Imagine iron dust filling or 1 carbon fiber flowing in the blood.. can this happen?
 

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  • #2
Drakkith
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If you have fillings (such as from iron dusts or carbon fiber) stuck in your skin? would it eventually join with your blood flow?
In most cases, no. The natural shedding process of the skin would eventually push it outwards until it is shed. However if they have penetrated deep into or beyond the skin, then it is possible that they can be taken up into the bloodstream.

What is the filter system of the blood where it couldn't accept the smallest particle and how big is the particle? Imagine iron dust filling or 1 carbon fiber flowing in the blood.. can this happen?
If the particles are substantially larger than the bodies ability to filter them out, then they are unlikely to be able to flow through the capillaries in the liver and kidneys. These would simply get stuck somewhere until broken down by natural chemical reactions. Or if they are very stable compounds that don't easily break down then they would simply stay put, possibly causing a problem if the immune system recognizes the material as foreign and attempts to partition it off.
 
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  • #3
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In most cases, no. The natural shedding process of the skin would eventually push it outwards until it is shed. However if they have penetrated deep into or beyond the skin, then it is possible that they can be taken up into the bloodstream.



If the particles are substantially larger than the bodies ability to filter them out, then they are unlikely to be able to flow through the capillaries in the liver and kidneys. These would simply get stuck somewhere until broken down by natural chemical reactions. Or if they are very stable compounds that don't easily break down then they would simply stay put, possibly causing a problem if the immune system recognizes the material as foreign and attempts to partition it off.
If the splinter is not.deep.enough and just imbedded into skin with a initial puncture. I wonder how deep before anaerobic environment can produce tetanus?
 
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Not taking any chances.. I went to the ER and get anti-tetanus shot.. my cousin doctor told me not to take the Tetanus Toxoid and Immunglobulin simultaneous as they can contradict each other.. so I just took the TIG (Tetanus Anti-Immunoglobulin) and would get the Tetanus Toxoid a months from now.

The ER doctor couldn't see the splinter because it's too small and they didn't remove it and just saying it may just come out. But I don't want the spores to continue living in my skin. I went to a store and tried their magnifying glass.. it's only 3X and not clear enough.

Does anyone know if there is a 10X or 20X magnifying glass or if I get a microscope.. can I see the splinter up close in my skin? A tweezer may be rough to get it out.. what is the instrument that can hold a few microns of splinters and take it out?
 
  • #5
jim mcnamara
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PF cannot provide medical advice. If the physician you saw was not concerned, you should not be concerned as well. Thread closed
 
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