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Sports on the Moon

  1. Mar 19, 2006 #1
    www.vanderbilt.edu/cso/SSI2003-Williamson/lessons/sportsonmoon/lesson.doc

    In my physical science class I am doing a project roughly like the one seen above. I have to apply physics concepts and formulas to design a sport on the moon. I was told in the future NASA will probably be using high-temperature superconducting discs for artificial gravity which makes this whole project seem really stupid to me . But anyway, anyone have any ideas or suggestions?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 22, 2006 #2
    You guys suck.
     
  4. Mar 22, 2006 #3

    Hootenanny

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    Staff Emeritus
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    Gold Member

    What is that in aid of?
     
  5. Mar 22, 2006 #4
    The gravity constant on the moon is approximately 1/6 that of Earth's, so you can use that if talking about trajectories.

    What's the use in asking for help and then insulting us? Not very good etiquette when you're new to a community! :)
     
  6. Mar 22, 2006 #5

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

    One of the rules that you agreed to when you signed on to post in the homework forum, is that you will show your work and demonstrate that you have tried to solve the problem. The rest of us then try to give you hints or suggestions on ways that you can get farther along in solving your problem.

    So a better way to have phrased your original post would have been to state the problem like you did, but then post your initial thoughts about what kinds of things should go into the report. For example, although humans have not lived on the moon for any period of time (as mentioned in the project document you posted), we *have* lived on space stations for extended periods of time. What kinds of athletic activities have been tried on space stations to help keep astronauts more fit? What were the problems and the results? Also, given the 1/6 gravity issue for the moon, what is the biggest problem with sports and athletics there? Hint -- it's very similar to the 0-gravity problem on the space stations.

    If you spend a little effort in your PF posts, I think you'll find out that we don't suck at all. We rock, son.
     
  7. Mar 23, 2006 #6
    Okay cool, some replies. let's see...

    First of all Mr. Berkman I have tried to solve the problem (me having a report) in several ways so far. I'm just at odds at how I'm supposed to demonstrate on a forum how I tried to bribe Mr. Kovax, threaten other kids into giving me their reports, and fake a traumatic breakdown. That would probably involve a video camera and another restraining order and I don't have time for that right now.

    Also thanks for the advice, oh and by the way... I am not your son. Calling me your son was completely innapropriate... I already have a father and am quite happy with him so please, keep your sick perverted fantasies to yourself. On a final note, you so do not rock in the slightest.

    Now as for "z-component" thanks for your incredible insight into the moon having app. 1/6 the acceleration due to gravity of the earth. Of course I had learned that in my physics class but to my dismay I was shortly thereafter bludgeoned in the head repeatedly by my lab assistant after telling her she was ugly as sin and should keep her PMS to herself. Idk what I would have done if you didn't remind me, except that it might involve opening my textbook to page 3.

    "What is that in aid of?" -Mr. Hoot
    Helping you acknowledge your suckiness.


    ...why do I waste my creativity on things like this?
     
  8. Mar 23, 2006 #7
    Well, the PF community at large is very successful and insightful. I have to agree with berkeman and declare that we, PF, do rock! I've never been more pleased with a website and if you give it time, you should agree. The range of discussion is wonderful and you can learn a lot here, no matter how much physics you know.
     
  9. Mar 23, 2006 #8

    ranger

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    Gold Member

    right on:cool: .
     
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