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Spotting 2005 YU55

  1. Nov 7, 2011 #1

    DaveC426913

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    Can anyone direct me to some instructions that will tell me how I might be able to spot it? I know it may be difficult and may require a scope of at least 6", but we'll see.

    I keep hearing that it will be moving "very" fast. How fast? Fast enough to see movement against the background?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 7, 2011 #2

    davenn

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    hey Dave
    try this site it has the asteroid path on a starmap

    http://cuyastro.org/

    Im envious We don't even get a chance to see it in the sthrn hemisphere

    Dave
     
  4. Nov 7, 2011 #3

    DaveC426913

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    Awesome. Thanks.

    Wow! Those ticks are marking off hours.
     
  5. Nov 7, 2011 #4

    davenn

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    I dont know if you are in a dark site or can get to a dark site near home. ?
    It would be interesting to get a camera on a tripod and do a really long exposure ...aperture wide open eg F2 - F5 the best you can do and exposures of up to 30 minutes.
    You will get long star trails, but you mite, just mite see a faint path of the asteroid cutting across the trails. It would really be worth a try :)

    cheers
    Dave

    PS ... 30mins was with good ol' film camera would be worth trying say 10 - 15 mins with a DSLR
     
  6. Nov 8, 2011 #5

    Drakkith

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    Hrmm. Maybe I can get a few shots of it in my scope. I'll have to take everything into work, or miss the closest approach.
     
  7. Nov 8, 2011 #6

    turbo

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    Good luck, Drakkith. Hope to see shots.
     
  8. Nov 8, 2011 #7

    turbo

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    BTW, Curt Renz's calculations show that the asteroid will span the apparent width of the Moon in about 3.5 minutes, at closest approach, so if you have a decent-sized 'scope, you'd have to be pretty fancy to capture that asteroid as a "spot" instead of a streak.
     
  9. Nov 8, 2011 #8

    Drakkith

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    My plan is to point to the location ahead of time and just start taking exposures when it comes time. Trying to actually track it with the scope is useless unless I can manually do it. Which is unlikely.
     
  10. Nov 8, 2011 #9

    DaveC426913

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    You think it's moving that fast?


    Also, closest approach is 11:30 UT, isn't that, like, 5AM ET?
     
  11. Nov 8, 2011 #10

    Drakkith

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    Hrmm. I didn't realize it was UT. That makes it 1800, aka 6 PM my time.
     
  12. Nov 8, 2011 #11

    DaveC426913

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    Barely past dusk...

    What part of the sky is it in at that time? If anywhere other than East, we might be out of luck anyway.
     
  13. Nov 8, 2011 #12

    DaveC426913

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    Forget photos. I want video! I want to see an object noticeably moving across the starscape in real time. That would be awesome!
     
  14. Nov 8, 2011 #13

    Drakkith

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    It will be in the East, passing right through Pegasus at the time. We have thunderstorms raining down on us now, so I wouldn't be able to see it today no matter what lol.
     
  15. Nov 8, 2011 #14
    Wait so if those ticks mark hours, that means I should be able to see it for quite a while, right?

    I have an 8 inch Dobsonian and I live in Phoenix. I missed the closest pass but I assume it will still be visible at later hours. I won't be around my telescope until about 8 PM Arizona time (7 hours off UTC).
     
  16. Nov 8, 2011 #15
    Also, I have the 2010 version of Starry Night and apparently 2005 YU55 is not in the database.
     
  17. Nov 8, 2011 #16
    Nevermind I just had to run update.

    Hooray, it will be visible well after I get home.
     
  18. Nov 8, 2011 #17

    Drakkith

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    Yeah I'm hoping it will clear up for me tonight so I can catch a view too.
     
  19. Nov 8, 2011 #18
    I just saw a NASA radar image of it, how come the bottom half of the astroid is in shadow like an optical image?
     
  20. Nov 8, 2011 #19
    Most likely due to the relative wavelengths they are observing. While all objects emit at least trace levels of radio-waves, it's hard to detect. Most radio-waves are reflected off an object. So if part of the asteroid is in a shadow,not directly in the path of the suns light, there can be a shadow in other sections of the light spectrum.
     
  21. Nov 8, 2011 #20

    DaveC426913

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    Or more simply, since the asteroid doesn't emit any radiation on its own, all radiation - including radio - will be as reflected light from the sun.
     
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