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Spring constant and temperature

  1. Jan 29, 2004 #1

    Does anybody know any possible relationship between spring constant and the temperature of that spring??
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 3, 2004 #2

    Chi Meson

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    THe spring constant ,k , is a force constant for a particular spring. The temperature is a measurement of the average kinetice energy of the molecules of the spring. THey are not directly related.

    For most things, the "Young's modulus" of the material will change with the temperature, most things getting more easily stretched as temperature increases. Therefore the spring constant will get smaller for most things as the temperature goes up.

    Somethings get stiffer as temperature increases, so there is no absolute rule that associates these two characteristics.
  4. Jan 9, 2010 #3
    They ARE related! The spring is not an ordinary spring but polymers. You can derive Hook's Law by applying statistical methods and take the short displacement limit, the coeff. in the out front is obviously the spring const. and it is proportional to the temperature! I don't know why?!
  5. Aug 23, 2011 #4
    We can perform a simple experiment to know about the relationship between spring constant and temperature :
    STEP1 : Take a rubber and decrease its temperature.(keep it in your refrigerator)
    STEP2 : Now drop it on the floor to check its elasticity.
    If compared with a rubber at room temperature
    the elasticity of the cooled rubber will be less than the rubber at room temperature
    it simply means that when the temp is decreased the elasticity is also decreased
    the rubber behaves like spring as both are elastic materials
    spring constant k is inversly propotional to temperature.

    Last edited: Aug 23, 2011
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