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Spring has sprung

  1. Nov 30, 2007 #1

    J77

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    Cycling through the park on my way to work today, I noticed all the daffodil bulbs had started to come up -- some have even flowered!

    Where's the winter gone?

    I haven't even got a Christmas tree yet!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 30, 2007 #2

    ZapperZ

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    This isn't that unusual...... in the SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE!

    :)

    Zz.
     
  4. Nov 30, 2007 #3

    J77

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    ...but I'm in Holland!

    I want snow!
     
  5. Nov 30, 2007 #4

    Evo

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    We've already had two snow storms and they are predicting an ice storm tonight. :frown: I have to scrape ice off of my car windshield every morning. I'll gladly trade places with you!!
     
  6. Nov 30, 2007 #5
    It's 8F here and we're supposed to get up to two feet of snow by monday.
    Jealous yet? :)
     
  7. Nov 30, 2007 #6
    I'm in South Germany, have some of my snow. 4-5 inches
     
  8. Nov 30, 2007 #7

    turbo

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    Yesterday we had snow followed by freezing rain, and we're heading into single-digit temps (F) this weekend. This is the first year in 4-5 years that we've had something resembling winter in November. I hope it holds, for the sake of the ski areas, the snowmobile clubs, the winter tourism industry in general, and the maple-syrup industry. The last few winters have hurt them badly.
     
  9. Nov 30, 2007 #8

    J77

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    Well, at least we haven't got a ski season to ruin... :wink:

    e2a: Apparently it's about 50 degrees (F) right now -- at 5pm!
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2007
  10. Nov 30, 2007 #9

    Kurdt

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    If this is a sign of global warming, Holland is certainly the wrong place to be. :wink:
     
  11. Nov 30, 2007 #10

    G01

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    Here in Pennsylvania, we're having very nice weather for this time of year. Only recently has it even begun to drop below 40F during the day. Honestly, I hope it lasts. The less snow, makes my interstate commute much easier.

    Commuting is hard with snow. When there is snow outside I start off at my house and by the time I drive to school, I end up being the negative of myself. Commuting just doesn't work with snow...(I know. I apologize in advance.)
     
  12. Nov 30, 2007 #11
    Phoenix for the win.
     
  13. Nov 30, 2007 #12

    turbo

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    Yeah, but you don't get to snowshoe through the snowy forest out back of my house, and your summers are a bit on the warm side. I don't think it hit 90 here last summer - maybe a few days in the mid-80's. I'll admit I waited a bit too long to get my garlic in the ground, and spent much of last Sunday busting up dirt frozen to a depth of 3-4". A 1' x 35' raised bed didn't look all that big when I started, but I was sore and tired when I got done.
     
  14. Nov 30, 2007 #13
    1) I'm never home during summer, I'm always on vacation.

    2) I go on skiing trips every year.
     
  15. Nov 30, 2007 #14

    Gokul43201

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    Groaaan!
     
  16. Dec 10, 2007 #15

    Evo

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    We've been having unusually cold and icy/snowy weather for December. Our average high temperatures are what our average lows should be. :bugeye:

    We've had snow and ice every day since Friday. Tonight and tomorrow, well here's the forecast.

    :frown: We're hoping they officially close our office tomorrow.
     
  17. Dec 10, 2007 #16

    turbo

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    Sorry to hear that Evo. We had an ice storm like that in 1998 and the forests still haven't recovered. All the trees that were damaged by that provided feasts for insects. Many parts of the state were without power for weeks, and the only gas stations operating around here were ones that had the foresight to provide backup power generation to run their pumps. That storm was such a big event that if you Google on "ice storm" and "1998" you'll get thousands of accounts of the impact of the storm. Some parts of Canada got nailed pretty hard, too.
     
  18. Dec 10, 2007 #17

    Evo

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    Dang, by the time I leave work I'll bet there will be no firewood left to buy and I am out. I have some sterno and a lot of candles, batteries, etc. I'm going to have to get a harness for the Fruit Bat, I can't let him go sailing over the edge, I almost lost him again this morning. I'd better stock up on booze, just to keep the chill off, of course. :wink:

    I've got my ice cleats ready to strap onto my shoes.

    If you don't see me online tomorrow, you'll know I'm without power.
     
  19. Dec 10, 2007 #18
    This same type of thing occured here in Auckland, NZ, about 5 yrs ago. Winter was coming and the days getting cooler. Trees were starting to shed leaves all over the place. We had two big cherry trees in our front yard, and they had lost about half their foliage.
    Then things got warmer. The trees stopped dropping leaves and started budding, in the course of about a week. Winter went down the tubes and we had an 'Indian Summer' that year. The cherry trees looked a bit weird, with half their leaves from last summer still attached and new growth at the ends where the first lot had gone through the abscission process, and hit the ground. I guess it threw a few worms and insects who didn't get the 'expected' dead leaf-mass that year. Haven't seen many bees around either, like back in the day. Used to be dozens buzzing the dandelions and daisies in someone's lawn, or garden flowers.
     
  20. Dec 10, 2007 #19

    turbo

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    My wife and I bought a few of the shake-them LED flashlights to keep around. They're not as bright as the battery-powered lights we've got, but they're awfully handy - batteries don't last forever, but these little charged-capacitor lights can be recharged with just a few shakes. If there is a hardware store or (last resort - yuck!) a Wal-Mart near you, it would be a good idea to see if you can snag one of these when you get F-B's harness.

    For more light (for quite a long time, actually), you can get a rechargeable work light, too, and charge that big battery as soon as you get home. My Makita cordless power tools came with a charger, two 18-volt power packs and a work light with a swiveling head. Those power packs last a LONG time running that light. I've have never managed to run down a battery with it yet. I can set it up on the kitchen table pointed up at the boarded cathedral ceiling and the kitchen will be lit up well enough to prepare meals, etc. Luckily we have a gas range and oven. If you have some jugs and other big containers like lidded pots, you might want to fill them with water, because if the power goes out everywhere, the water treatment plant might not be running so good.:yuck:

    Good luck, Evo!
     
  21. Dec 10, 2007 #20

    Evo

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    Thanks! I think I will.

    I've got some oil lamps and I hope my coleman battery operated lamps didn't get tossed.
     
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