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Springs and mass?

  1. May 8, 2008 #1
    Springs and... mass??

    A spring with a force constant of 2.1 x 10^4 N/m compresses 0.035m when stepped on by a boxer. The mass of the boxer is....?

    k = 2.1 x 10^4 N/m
    x = 0.035m

    how would you be able to find the mass for this?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 8, 2008 #2

    G01

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    Welcome to PF sup90.

    You are expected to show your own efforts on a problem before anyone helps you. What have you tried? What are your thoughts on the problem? What formulas relate to the problem in question. What section of your textbook does the problem relate to? Answer these questions, and we'll be able to help you.

    Also, please post all homework type problems in the homework help section of the site next time.
     
  4. May 8, 2008 #3

    madmike159

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    F=Kx
    That is Force (in this case weight) = Force constant * change in length.
    Hope this helps.
     
  5. May 8, 2008 #4

    G01

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    There is a reason we require students to show work before we help them Mike.

    How does just giving him an answer without him doing ANY work, help him in the end?
     
  6. May 8, 2008 #5
    sorry for the late reply, yes i go that far..

    F = kx
    plug F into F = mg; knowing that g = 9.8

    and solve for m?

    i'm i on the right track?
     
  7. May 9, 2008 #6

    madmike159

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    I just gave him what he needs to work it out, I don't see how else I could help. Giving him a like to something would just be a longer way of helping him.
     
  8. May 9, 2008 #7
    yes sup, what you said is right. That is essentially how scales work.
     
  9. May 9, 2008 #8
    thank you for your time and help guys =D
     
  10. May 9, 2008 #9

    G01

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    Yes, you did indeed help him solve the problem, but I'm just pointing out, for next time, that the rules are that you shouldn't offer help until the original poster shows work. Those are the forum rules.
     
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