B Squaring light

First, I would like to say any response needs to be explained like I’m 5 years old. A degree in psychology didn’t require advanced math :) That said, here is my question: If any quantifiable number can be squared, does this mean light can also be squared. I read the forum about light being a constant but there was no definitive answer and a lot of mixed opinions.
 

mjc123

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Light isn't a number. Do you mean the speed of light? If so, yes - as in E = mc2
 

Doc Al

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If any quantifiable number can be squared, does this mean light can also be squared
Not sure what you mean by "can light be squared". Perhaps you mean the speed of light, which is a constant. Can a speed be squared? Sure. Squared speeds, even the speed of light squared, appear in many useful formulas.
 
Not sure what you mean by "can light be squared". Perhaps you mean the speed of light, which is a constant. Can a speed be squared? Sure. Squared speeds, even the speed of light squared, appear in many useful formulas.
It’s probab a crazy question but I was referring more to visible light spectrum and different wavelengths. To be honest I’m not even sure how to properly articulate the question so it may not even be something that can be answered but I am trying to gain an understanding of how the light spectrum differs in regard to speed vs distance. I would assume you can also square distance as well?
 

Doc Al

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how the light spectrum differs in regard to speed vs distance
The various colors of the spectrum have different wavelengths and frequencies, but the same speed (at least in a vacuum).

I would assume you can also square distance as well?
Sure, why not.
 
The various colors of the spectrum have different wavelengths and frequencies, but the same speed (at least in a vacuum).


Sure, why not.
Thank you! I think this answers :)
 

Mister T

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I read the forum about light being a constant but there was no definitive answer
When you square a speed you don't get another speed. Thus, if ##c## is the speed of light, then it makes no sense to say that ##c^2## is a faster speed.
 

Nugatory

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I would assume you can also square distance as well?
Yes, that's how we measure areas. A square plot of land 100 meters on a side has an area of (100 meters) squared, or 10000 square meters (also called one hectare).
 
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I was referring more to visible light spectrum and different wavelengths.
Light isn’t a number. So light cannot be squared. The wavelength of light, the speed of light, the frequency of light, the intensity of light, the energy of light, etc are all numbers (with corresponding units). They can all be squared.
 

sophiecentaur

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Light isn’t a number. So light cannot be squared. The wavelength of light, the speed of light, the frequency of light, the intensity of light, the energy of light, etc are all numbers (with corresponding units). They can all be squared.
Quantities are often 'squared' (also cubed and taken to various other powers) in mathematical formulae. However, within mathematical processes (jiggery pokery), the actual meaning of the intermediate symbols is not worth trying to suss out. What you put in and what you get out is (should be) valid and the input and outputs should match dimensionally but you can let Maths do the internal work and accept that the Mathematicians got it right. Scientists and Engineers tend to treat many mathematical procedures they use as black boxes. Life's too short unless you really want to get into the Maths - then there's no time left for the Science.
 
It’s probab a crazy question but I was referring more to visible light spectrum and different wavelengths. To be honest I’m not even sure how to properly articulate the question so it may not even be something that can be answered but I am trying to gain an understanding of how the light spectrum differs in regard to speed vs distance. I would assume you can also square distance as well?
There is no such thing as a crazy (or dumb) question. In physics there are often "crazy" (difficult to understand) answers. I agree with the answers so far. Since you asked about spectrum in regard to speed vs distance, I will tell you that light color (spectrum) shifts toward the red as objects giving off light that are far away in the universe travel away from us at speeds approaching the speed of light.
 

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