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SR: Time Dilation

  1. Jul 21, 2004 #1
    Someone told me that the normal time dilation formula [tex]\Delta t = \gamma t_{0}[/tex] is not correct and that the time dilation also depends on the distance (I'm not entirely sure of what). Is this true?
     
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  3. Jul 21, 2004 #2

    DW

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    He was probably referring to an accelerated frame observer. It is correct for calculating the time dilation of something with respect to an inertial frame.
     
  4. Jul 21, 2004 #3

    Tom Mattson

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    Your friend could also have been referring to the Lorentz transformed time interval in a frame S' for which two events in S do not occur at the same location. In that case:

    Δt'=γ(Δt-vΔx/c2)

    In that case, the time interval in S' depends on the spatial interval between the events in S. Of course, it would be a misnomer to call that "time dilation".

    However, in an inertial frame, for which Δx=0, the formula you state is correct.
     
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