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Stability of object

  1. Mar 5, 2016 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    is it necessary to find the meta center for this question ? the formula of meta center is I /Vd , the I ( moemtn of inertia ) for rectangle is (ab^3) / 12 , but what is a ? what is b ? i'm confused now

    2. Relevant equations


    3. The attempt at a solution
    ρ
    gVsubmerged = weight(579N)
    1025(9.81)Vsubmerged = weight(579N)
    Vsubmerged = 0.058m^3

    0.058m^3 = (1.2x0.9x hsubmerged)
    hsubmerged =0.054m

    center of buoyancy = 0.054/2 = 0.027m
    metacenter = I / Vd = [(ab^3) / 12 ] /Vd
     

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  3. Mar 5, 2016 #2
  4. Mar 5, 2016 #3

    haruspex

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    For a rectangle measuring a by b, the second moment of area about an axis through the mid points of the sides of length b is ##\frac 1{12}ab^3##.
     
  5. Mar 11, 2016 #4
    what is the value of a and b ? is the second moment about x -axis(Ixx) , right ? IMO , a is 0.9m , b is 1.2m , am i correct ?
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2016
  6. Mar 11, 2016 #5

    haruspex

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    In principle, you should consider each axis as a potential axis for tipping. However, it is obvious that one of ab3, a3b is the larger. Which gives the greater danger of tipping, the larger or the smaller?
     
  7. Mar 11, 2016 #6
    how to know which axis is more danger of tipping ?

    the hydrostatic pressure act on the top and the bottom surface of the object , so i am consdiering the moment about x of tipping
     
  8. Mar 11, 2016 #7

    haruspex

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    Is tipping more likely with a high metacentre or a low one?
     
  9. Mar 11, 2016 #8
    low metccenter , right ?
     
  10. Mar 11, 2016 #9

    haruspex

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  11. Mar 11, 2016 #10
  12. Mar 11, 2016 #11
  13. Mar 11, 2016 #12

    haruspex

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    Yes.
    To get a low metacentre, does "I" need to be large or small? If a>b, which of ab3 and a3b will give that less stable i?
     
  14. Mar 12, 2016 #13
    to get low metacenter , the I has to be small. since the water pressure act on the bottom of the box , the b is 1.2m , a is 0.9m , am i right ?
     
  15. Mar 12, 2016 #14

    haruspex

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    It depends how you are defining a and b. Is that using the a3b form or the ab3 form?
     
  16. Mar 12, 2016 #15
    I am using
    ab3
     
  17. Mar 12, 2016 #16

    haruspex

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    Does a=.9, b=1.2 give a lower I than the other way around?
     
  18. Mar 12, 2016 #17
    a=1.2 , b = 0.3 , i would get lower metacenter , but the formula is yp = yc + Ixx / (ycA) , Ixx is the second moment of inertia about x-axis . Ir cant be changed , right ?
     
  19. Mar 12, 2016 #18

    haruspex

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    The object in question could tip about either of two axes. If you fix one direction as x and apply that formula you will only be considering one axis of tipping.
     
  20. Mar 12, 2016 #19
    why not 3 axes? since the object is 3d ( as shown in the diagram )
     
  21. Mar 12, 2016 #20
    for a = 1.2 , b = 0.3 , i will get metacenter = 1.25m , but , which value to choose ? 1.25m or 2.22m( a = 0.3, b = 1.2 ) ?
    if metacenter = 1.25m or 2.22m , G located at 0.86m +0.3m =1.16 m , object is stable
     
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