Standard Model - strange feeling

In summary, the Standard Model is a theory of particle physics that includes 3 generations of particles, 2 types of particles (quarks and leptons), and 12 fermions (or 24 if anti-particles are included). However, the model faces challenges as the medium and heavy generations are not stable. This leaves only 4 particles of the light generation and the neutrino plays a minimal role in matter. Additionally, efforts to create stable systems using quarks have been unsuccessful, leading to the conclusion that the model is a failure. However, it is noted that neutrons are almost stable and can be used to form atoms, which can then create matter that can support biological organisms. The decay of symmetries is a natural
  • #1
Dmitry67
2,567
1
Does anyone share the same strange feeling I have about the Standard Model? The feeling that it had almost failed…

So, let me present you Standard Model: 3 generations, 2 types of particles (quarks and leptons), dividing into 2 subtypes (upper/lower, lepton/neutrino), giving 12 fermions, or even 24 if we add anti-particles, plus bosons! Good work! I’ll create all sorts of different types of matter using these particles!

Oh, wait. You say, medium and heavy generations are not stable. Ok, so we have at least 8 fermions and endless combinations! Right? Wrong. At first, only particles will survive, so we have only 4 particles of the light generation. Then neutrino plays almost no role in matter (it plays an important role in how heave elements are created, but not how they constructed)

So we end with u,d quarks and electron. Fortunately, color interaction is very strong. So we will be able to create many systems from these quarks… Ooops, no 2-quark systems are stable! Whats about 4,5,6-quark systems? Nothing!

Last hope, 3-quark systems… only 1 is stable… Total failure… Then it appears that it is not so bad, neutrons are almost stable, and they are stable in nuclei, so we have the variety of atoms to create matter which can be used to create biological organisms, but it in very beginning it looks very bad.
 
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  • #2
You seem to be describing a process of self-organised development driven by the principles of thermodynamic equilibrium. It is very natural that an initial high symmetry would decay to its most broken possible mode.

The surprise is that there is any stable matter left. The universe was thwarted in its attempts to become a pure radiation heat sink. Instead it has protons and electrons and neutrinos, little pesky kinks in its spacetime.

Symmetries decay if they can. Important fact of nature.
 

1. What is the Standard Model?

The Standard Model is a theoretical framework in physics that describes the fundamental particles and their interactions that make up the universe. It is currently the best explanation we have for the behavior of matter at the smallest scales.

2. What is a "strange feeling" in the context of the Standard Model?

In the Standard Model, the term "strange feeling" refers to the strange quark, which is one of six types of quarks that make up the building blocks of matter. The strange quark is named for its unusual properties, such as its relatively long lifetime and its ability to change into other types of quarks.

3. How does the Standard Model explain the behavior of particles?

The Standard Model explains the behavior of particles through the interactions between three of the fundamental forces of nature: the strong nuclear force, the weak nuclear force, and the electromagnetic force. These interactions can be described using mathematical equations and have been extensively tested through experiments.

4. Is the Standard Model a complete theory of physics?

No, the Standard Model is not a complete theory of physics. It does not include gravity, and there are still many unanswered questions, such as the origin of mass and the nature of dark matter. Scientists are currently working on theories that can extend or improve upon the Standard Model.

5. Why is the Standard Model important?

The Standard Model is important because it provides a framework for understanding the fundamental particles and forces of the universe. It has successfully predicted and explained many experimental results, and it continues to guide our understanding of the subatomic world. It also serves as a starting point for developing new theories and exploring unanswered questions in physics.

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