Standing Waves help 30 mins left.

In summary, Standing Waves are a type of wave that occurs when two identical waves traveling in opposite directions interfere with each other, creating a pattern of nodes and antinodes that appear to stand still. In the given problem, the ratio of tensions between two strings vibrating at different frequencies and harmonics can be calculated using the formula for wavelength and velocity. The frequency of the second string in its fundamental mode can also be calculated using the given information.
  • #1
evgeniy
8
0
Standing Waves help! 30 mins left.

Hello everyone who's here, so far I've been doing great on waves, but what the heck is standing eave?

Here is a problem that I kinda get, but not completely:

Two strings, with the same mass/length m oscillate with the same frequency f=2.00 Hz. The first string has length L1, tension T1 and vibrates in the fundamental mode (n=1). The second string has length L2, tension T2 and vibrates in the third harmonic (n=3). Assuming L2=2.30 L1:

a) What is the ratio T1/T2?

b) What would be the frequency of the second string if it oscillates in the mode n=1?

what the hell is fundamental mode?
please help, or at least give hints,
thanks a lot
 
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  • #2
well it's kinda late now, and i got the answers here:

1) 1.70
2) 0.667 Hz

Can anyone tell me how to get them at least so i know how to do them on the test?? (formulas may be)?
 
  • #3
Main fomulae:

L= (2n-1)(wavelength)/4

and velocity=(frequency)(wavelength)

where L=length of string
 
  • #4
are u saying to find wavelength first?
what about the tension?
 
  • #5
evgeniy said:
are u saying to find wavelength first?
what about the tension?

The speeds of the waves are equal to sqrt(tension/mass per unit length). Since the masses are the same, ratio of speeds will be the square root of the ratio of tensions.
 

Related to Standing Waves help 30 mins left.

1. What are standing waves?

Standing waves are a type of wave that appears to be standing still, hence the name. They are formed when two waves with the same frequency and amplitude traveling in opposite directions interfere with each other. This results in certain points along the wave appearing to be stationary, while others experience maximum displacement.

2. How do standing waves form?

Standing waves form when two waves with the same frequency and amplitude traveling in opposite directions meet and interfere with each other. This results in the formation of nodes and antinodes, which are points of maximum and minimum displacement respectively.

3. What are the properties of standing waves?

Standing waves have several properties. They have nodes and antinodes, which are points of maximum and minimum displacement respectively. They also have fixed wavelengths and frequencies, and cannot transport energy. Additionally, standing waves can only form in confined spaces, such as strings or pipes.

4. How can standing waves be helpful?

Standing waves have many practical applications. For example, they are used in musical instruments to create specific notes and harmonics. They are also used in scientific experiments to study the properties of waves and interference. In addition, standing waves are used in telecommunications to transmit information through fiber optic cables.

5. How can I calculate the frequency and wavelength of a standing wave?

The frequency and wavelength of a standing wave can be calculated using the formula f=nv/2L, where f is the frequency, v is the velocity of the wave, n is the number of nodes, and L is the length of the medium. The wavelength can then be calculated by dividing the velocity of the wave by the frequency.

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