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Standing waves

  1. May 28, 2006 #1
    Sir,
    I have some doubts regarding standing waves. Can anyone who is online now clear my doubts?
    For the production of standing waves should the 2 interfering waves have the same amplitude, should they be in phase, should they have the same frequency and velocity? I have this doubt because each book states different conditions.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 28, 2006 #2

    Astronuc

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    Staff: Mentor

    Hopefully this helps -
    http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/Hbase/waves/standw.html

    The amplitude need not be the same, but the wavelengths (frequency) would be, so this also infers the same wave velocity, since the interfering waves must be in phase temporally.
     
  4. May 28, 2006 #3
    Sir,
    I didn’t understand one thing. You said that the waves will be in phase temporarily. Could u please explain it in detail? Also,can standing waves be produced by the interference of 2 waves of same frequency moving in opposite directions having a constant phase difference? If Yes,will this initial phase difference be maintained always?
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2006
  5. May 28, 2006 #4
  6. May 29, 2006 #5

    Astronuc

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    Staff: Mentor

    No, I said "the waves will be in phase temporally". Temporally is an adverb meaning with respect to time, or in time.

    Standing waves must be in phase, inedependent of time, which means that they must have the same wavelength AND speed.
     
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