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Static and current electricity

  • Thread starter name_ask17
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  • #1
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Homework Statement


Three resistors, 21, 43, and 73 , are connected in series, and a 0.55 A current passes through them. What is
(a) the equivalent resistance and
(b) the potential difference across the three resistors?



Homework Equations


i tried to use EPE/q by putting the equivalent resistors/1.6E-6 charge. i dont think this is right though :/



The Attempt at a Solution


I got a as 137 and that is correct but i cant seem to get part b.

Homework Statement





Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution

 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
gneill
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You want Ohm's Law. Look it up!
 
  • #3
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v=IR, but how does that help me find potential difference?
 
  • #4
gneill
Mentor
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2,773
v=IR, but how does that help me find potential difference?
What do the variables in the formula represent?
 
  • #5
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volts=resistance(current)
is potential difference under volts?...because i tried 11*25 but that was marked incorrect by my online homework
 
  • #6
gneill
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20,793
2,773
Potential difference is given in volts.
Current is given in Amps.
Resistance is given in Ohms.

You have the resistance and the current. Find the voltage.
 
  • #7
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what is my current?
and do i use the the equivalent capacity as resistance?
 
  • #8
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(b) each of the three resistors or across all of them together?
If it is the later: delta V = IRtotal

** the current is the same through each of them and all of them (connection in series).
 
  • #9
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the question just says the potential difference across the three resistors; so i think it might be the total. but i am still confused on which part is the current
 
  • #10
gneill
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20,793
2,773
the question just says the potential difference across the three resistors; so i think it might be the total. but i am still confused on which part is the current
It is explicitly stated in the problem.
 
  • #11
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"I" is the current.
In your case: 0.55 A i.e. 0.55 Ampere (a unit of electric current).

Your question suggests you need to go back to your notebook/coursebook and reading that chapter again (Ohm's Law in a series circuit) and mostly looking at the examples and the implementation of the law.

good luck.
 
  • #12
146
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YYYEESSS!. thank YOU.
also thanks for putting up w/me thru this problem
i was making it harder than it is
 

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