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Statistic Retour

  1. Aug 22, 2009 #1
    I haven't touch statistics for year and now I came back to find I am totally lost.
    Here is one of the question that I wish to know how to solve it, in terms of steps, so that I can gain back memory about it.

    I know it is a bit too much, but I am really very very lost and depressed, help.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 22, 2009 #2
    These types of questions are straightforward, you just have to look up the appropriate technique (and get familiar with the terminology). According to
    http://www.fmi.uni-sofia.bg/vesta/Virtual_Labs/interval/interval6.html [Broken] :
    let S^2 be the sample variance of normally distributed data
    let [tex]\chi^2_{n,a}[/tex] be the number x such that if X has a [tex]\chi^2[/tex] distribution with n degrees of freedom , then P(X < x) = a.
    then
    [tex]\left(\frac{n-1}{\chi^2_{n-1,1-a/2}}S^2,\frac{n-1}{\chi^2_{n-1,a/2}}S^2\right)[/tex]
    is a 1-a confidence interval for the distribution variance. You can calculate this interval numerically using a table for the [tex]\chi^2[/tex] distribution or some stats software.

    In part 2, you need to use a one-sample t-test.

    If these terms are unfamiliar to you, you just need to review your stats book and look up what you don't remember.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
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