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Statistics Question

  1. May 9, 2006 #1
    I need to perform an independent samples t-test with unequal variables on these two sample sets. There are 30 samples in each. So far, I've come up with the following information.

    t(43) = 7.81, p < 0.001

    degrees of freedom = 43
    t statistic = 7.81
    p statistic = <0.001

    I need confirmation if that's correct. Also, what does this say about the statistics? Is it valid enough? I'm trying to show that the difference between the averages of the two groups is statistically significant. Thanks if you can help.


    Set 01

    1.073
    0.598
    0.876
    1.434
    0.636
    0.705
    0.524
    0.561
    0.401
    0.516
    0.916
    1.243
    0.628
    0.615
    0.537
    1.166
    0.635
    0.615
    0.909
    0.728
    1.180
    1.223
    0.582
    0.833
    0.964
    1.038
    0.636
    1.077
    0.427
    0.602


    Set 02

    0.244
    0.283
    0.516
    0.237
    0.427
    0.413
    0.457
    0.293
    0.365
    0.152
    0.500
    0.232
    0.343
    0.335
    0.476
    0.329
    0.523
    0.192
    0.478
    0.523
    0.293
    0.198
    0.304
    0.679
    0.241
    0.314
    0.246
    0.109
    0.276
    0.617
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 10, 2006 #2
    with a p-value that low, its obvius that the difference is statistically significant.

    as for if you have all the t-values, im not sure if its correct, do you have a confidence interval?
     
  4. May 10, 2006 #3
    Is a confidence interval necessary if I have a p-value instead?
     
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