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Statistics: the W's

  1. Nov 9, 2004 #1
    For this set of data is this correct?
    [​IMG]
    The W’s:
    Who: People in the United States of America
    What: Number estimated to die
    When: 2005 to 2050
    Where: United States of America
    How: By conducting a census and predicting the deaths based on previous death trends
    Why: To find out how many people are estimated to die in the years 2005 to 2050 in the United States of America.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2004
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 9, 2004 #2
    looks right, at first I thought you were asking if the chart was correct, that threw me off.
     
  4. Nov 9, 2004 #3
    Is this wrong for this set of data and the W's?

    The Deaths of the US population (in thousands) is unimodal with the mode between 8.25 and 8.5 thousand deaths (See Figure 1.1). The data is roughly symmetrical, and is slightly skewed to the right with no outliers. The data has a median of 8.82, which means that half of the deaths lie above 8.82 thousand and half of them lie below 8.82 thousand. The range of the data is 9.6 thousand -8.25 thousand or 1.35 thousand deaths, and the IQR is 9.46 thousand - 8.35 thousand or 1.11 thousand deaths. The data has a mean of 8.89 thousand deaths, and a standard deviation of .52 thousand deaths between the years of 2005 and 2050. The mean and standard deviation are good to use for this set of data because it is roughly symmetric and it does not have any outliers. There aren’t any unusual features about the data.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Nov 9, 2004 #4
    I was asking because someone told me that my W's were wrong and they should be:

    Who: Projected deaths for 2005-2050 in 25,000 intervals
    What: Number of years that predicted each interval
    When: 2005 to 2050
    Where: The United States of America
    How: By conducting a census and predicting the deaths based on previous death trends
    Why: To show which predictions were made most frequently
     
  6. Nov 9, 2004 #5
    I didn't even know there were set guidelines as to who who was, and what what was.
     
  7. Nov 9, 2004 #6
    It's for my ap statistics class. There really are not specific guidelines for them. Someone just told me that my W's did not match my histogram and data. Is what I did wrong?
     
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