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A Status of asymptotic safety

  1. May 1, 2017 #1
    Hi everybody, I guess most of you know of the 2009 higgs mass prediction. Nevertheless there has been important changes in the top quark mass estimations. So I wanted to know:
    1 if there is any update on that prediction and if it is still in good agreement with the Higgs mass?
    2 if there is at least possibility of good agreement with cosmological constant, dark matter, etc.
    Just to sum up, if AS is still a possibility or not.

    Thanks in advance!!!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 7, 2017 #2
    Thanks for the thread! This is an automated courtesy bump. Sorry you aren't generating responses at the moment. Do you have any further information, come to any new conclusions or is it possible to reword the post? The more details the better.
     
  4. May 7, 2017 #3
    I guess that the two questions were very clear! Does anyone have any feedback?

    Thanks in advance
     
  5. May 8, 2017 #4

    mfb

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    Staff: Mentor

    There were many Higgs mass predictions, more than one per GeV in the most interesting range, and more than 20 were compatible with the actual Higgs mass.
    Which prediction do you mean?
     
  6. May 8, 2017 #5
    • mH = 126.3 ± 2.2 GeV Authors: Shaposhnikov & C. Wetterich (2009) Idea: Assume that gravity is asymptotically safe, that there are no intermediate energy scales between the Fermi and Planck scales, that the gravity induced anomalous dimension of the Higgs selfcoupling is positive. Techniques: renormalisation group flow with mt = 171.2 GeV

    I thought it was clear from the title. Sorry!
    Anyway, as I think that mt estimation should have changed by now, I was wondering if this sort of prediction still holds.
    Also I wanted to know if there is any tension between AS and something else beyond SM (Dark Matter, Cosmological Constant, Inflation, Neutrinos, whatever)

    Thanks!
     
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